Seili (Själo in Swedish) is a small island in the Archipelago Sea. The island is known for its church and nature, a research institute and a former hospital. The first hospital on Seili was established in the 1620s. Before that there were two farms on the islands belonging to the Crown and thus available when the authorities looked for a suitable island to which the leper hospital at the outskirts of Turku could be moved.

According to a Royal Decree in 1619 by King Gustav Adolf of Sweden, the buildings of the hospital in Turku, with the exception of the chapel, were burned down and the inmates transported to Seili. The Selihospital for lepers was dedicated to St George. The last leper patient died in 1785, and the establishment on Seili became a hospital or a place of confinement for mentally afflicted people until 1962. The hospital was self-sufficient with agriculture, and fishing. The present-day buildings on the island, with the exception of the chapel, date from the 19th and the 20th centuries, and most of them have been built for the mental hospital.

The wooden chapel of Seili was built in as a replacement of the Church of Saint George, the former hospital church which had been transferred to Seili from Turku in the beginning of the 17th century. The museum church has a cross-shaped plan and it is made of pinewood grown in archipelago islands. The original untreated wooden surface can still be seen inside the church and nowadays it is beautifully patinated by passed centuries. The only colourful objects in the otherwise quite barren but impressive interior are the pulpit decorated by C.J. von Holthusen and the modernistic altarpiece The Storm on Lake Genesaret painted by the Finnish artist Helge Stén.

Currently the island hosts the Archipelago Research Institute that is a part of the University of Turku. The island is open to the public in summertime and there are guided tours available. During the summer season, the connecting ferry m/s Östern operates on the Nauvo-Seili-Hanka (Aasla, Rymättylä) route. Therefore, Seili is accessible from both Nauvo and Hanka.

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Details

Founded: 1620s
Category:
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Finland)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
proseili.fi

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Toni R (4 months ago)
Kaunis luonto ja mielenkiintoinen historia. Päivävierailu riittää hyvin saaren läpikäymiseen.
Tobü Wierrels (8 months ago)
Great place, but had to bring my own boards, which made one star out.
MRJ (14 months ago)
Great to see an island with a sad history.
Sami Oinonen (16 months ago)
Seili is an island for a perfect weekend getaway with fascinating history, groves, meadows and cliffs. Thanks to poor mobile phone connectivity you have all the time in the world to do absolutely nothing. Seili is a bucket list item, just like Örö or Bengtskär.
Markus Sauvola (2 years ago)
A beautiful island near Nauvo and Naantali. I definitely recommend a visit here. It has beautiful nature, interesting history and peaceful atmosphere ?? top notch!
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