Børglum Abbey

Vrå, Denmark

Børglum Abbey was originally a royal farm which dated back as far as 1000, if not earlier. In 1086 King Canute IV fled from his residence at Børglum when the peasants revolted against him. The royal residence was burned to the ground but rebuilt sometime later.

At some point between 1134 and 1139, the royal estate at Børglum was granted to the church to become the new seat of the bishopric of northern Jutland, also known as the bishopric of Vendsyssel, previously established at Vestervig. Bishop Self (or Sylvester) of Vestervig became the first Bishop of Børglum (Vendsyssel) in 1139, and Børglum remained the seat of the diocese until the Reformation.

It is unclear exactly who first established a monastery there, but it seems possible that the Augustinians previously settled at Vestervig had moved to Børglum by 1134. In the 1180s the Premonstratensians, or White Canons, were established here, as a daughter house of Steinfeld Abbey near Cologne in Germany. Børglum then in its turn became the mother house for all Premonstratensian monasteries in Scandinavia. The abbey quickly became prominent, perhaps with the help of royal patronage, and set up a seminary, where many noble families sent at least one of their sons to study. The Premonstratensians expanded the abbey and its church during the time of Bishop Troel.

Some time before 1220 the Bishop of Vendsyssel made the abbey his episcopal seat. The abbey church became the cathedral of the bishopric of Vendsyssel, or Børglum, and the canons took on the additional role of the cathedral chapter. Besides being the biggest landowner in North Jutland, the bishop was ex officio part of the State Council which advised the King of Denmark on domestic and international policy. This further enhanced the reputation of Børglum Abbey, making it one of most influential religious houses in Denmark.

The abbey church, later also cathedral, was built as a typical Romanesque basilica and formed the eastern range of the monastery. It is believed that the builders modelled its construction and decoration on Viborg Cathedral. It was built of granite, obtained locally. A flat timber ceiling and the absence of windows would have made it dark, but the massive walls would have prevented the cold winds and storms off the North Sea, just a few miles to the west, from penetrating the building.

Hans Christian Andersen wrote a version of the old folk legend 'The Bishop of Borglum and his Men' which recounts the murder of Bishop of Borglum, Oluf Glob, and several companions by his nephew, Jens Glob, in front of the altar at Hvidebjerg Church on Thy Island in 1206.

One of the annual events for which Børglum was famous was the market on or near St. Bodil's day, June 17. Bodil's sacred spring which was a religious site back in Viking times was believed to have healing power. In 1500 a fire destroyed much of the old abbey church and a new church was begun, but in the later Gothic style with high arched ceilings. Work was slow, but by 1520 the choir and nave had been rebuilt and work had begun on the transepts to join the two together. The Reformation in the 1520s and 1530s brought the reconstruction to a halt.

Børglum Abbey was dissolved when Denmark became officially Lutheran on 30 October 1536. Its assets reverted to the crown and it became a royal property once again. The abbey church continued in use as the cathedral church for northern Jutland until 1554, when the Lutheran bishop moved the episcopal seat to the Budolfi Church in Aalborg. The vast Børglum Abbey estate was broken up and sold off or given to noble families. The abbey's main building became a large manor house and the outbuildings were either demolished or converted to farm use.

Without constant attention the buildings began to deteriorate; the church especially fell into total disrepair. A local nobleman, Godslev Budde, received permission from Frederik II to demolish the incomplete transepts and enclose the church in the original basilica form.

As a manor house, the former abbey buildings at Børglum have survived to modern times. The church continues to serve as the local parish church.

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Details

Founded: c. 1134
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Karina Heinemeier (3 years ago)
Var til julemarked og må desværre sige jeg blev lidt skuffet. Der var pyntet fint op, men synes ikke der var meget jul over boderne desværre. Boderne var endvidere placeret på lofterne, hvilket betød at der ikke var meget plads til de besøgende at gå rundt på. Heller ikke så optimalt at have børn med. Slet ikke hvis man har barnevogn med. Inde på klostret var det ejerne selv, som bød os velkommen. Super fint og flot pyntet op. I gården var der brændte mandler og julemusik.
Jess Ingemann Jensen (3 years ago)
Super hyggeligt sted, som ligger flot på toppen af bakken og kan ses milevidt omkring. Især når mørket falder på, og bygningerne er lyst op. Det er et smukt syn. Har været her mange gange efterhånden og er aldrig blevet skuffet. Det er altid et besøg hver.
Snowy Aura (3 years ago)
Very historical. As a youngster, I would say that it is a little bit boring.
Annette Holst (3 years ago)
Fantastisk oplevelse at nærstudere det flotte Bayeux tapet, genskabt af nogle nordjyske ildsjæle, der har brugt mange år på det over 70 m lange broderi. Genvisit 2018: Stadig en flot oplevelse. Også legetøjs- og kjoleudstilling er yderst interessant og flot. På sommertur til Bayeux 2018: De orig. tapeter virker mindre i højden og er naturligvis meget "falmede" i farven, og de må ikke fotograferes, så godt vi har de danske tapeter - fotograferet uden blitz.
Ilisidie Wedelein (4 years ago)
Wonderful, Bayeuxtapet...
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