The Old City Hall at Gammeltorv Aalborg was built in 1762 and served as city hall until 1912. Today it is only used for ceremonial and representative purposes. The city hall was built by master builder Daniel Popp, who had moved to Aalborg from Copenhagen, and was modelled on Johan Conrad Ernst's City Hall there, which was later completely destroyed in the Copenhagen Fire of 1795. This was a specific requirement from Iver Holck, the county governor at Aalborghus. Designed in the Late Baroque style, the building consists of two storeys and a cellar under a black-glazed tile roof. The yellow-washed facade is decorated with white pilasters and a frontispiece featuring the Danish coat of arms and a bust of King Frederick V. His motto, Prudentia et Constantia, is also seen above the main entrance. The well-preserved door is a local example of the Rococo style. The building was listed by the Danish Heritage Agency in 1918.

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Gammeltorv 2, Ålborg, Denmark
See all sites in Ålborg

Details

Founded: 1757-1762
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark
Historical period: Absolutism (Denmark)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Karsten Eriksen (3 years ago)
Fint rådhus
Karsten Bach (3 years ago)
Vi var en lille netværksgruppe der havde den ære at få lov at holde møde i borgmesterstuen i dette flotte historiske Rådhus. Aalborg Rådhus er opført i 1762 i senbarokstil, dannede indtil 1912 rammen om Aalborg Kommunes administration, men anvendes i dag udelukkende til vielser og repræsentative formål. Over indgangsdøren ses Frederik den 5.'s valgsprog "Forsigtig og Bestandig".
Stella Bøgfeldt (3 years ago)
Flot rådhus til bryllup
Ebrima Ceesay (3 years ago)
Nice place
Hanne Hartmann (3 years ago)
Flot gammel bygning
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The castle first mentioned in 1200 was originally owned by the King and later, at the end of the 13th century it fell in hands of Matúš Èák. Its owners alternated - at the end of the 14th century the family of Stibor of Stiborice bought it.

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