Mårup Church Ruins

Hjørring, Denmark

Mårup Church was built around 1250 in the late Romanesque style. It was a simple brick structure typical of Jutland village churches, consisting of nave and choir. A tower existing in the 18th century was demolished and a free-standing bell tower was erected of wood. The church had arched pilasters, some of which can still be seen.

On December 6, 1808, HMS Crescent, a British frigate on its way to Gothenburg, Sweden, sank while bringing supplies to the Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars. More than 200 sailors were buried in a common grave; seven officers and 55 seamen survived. Two additional British ships sank off Denmark"s west coast and the British installed a tablet to honor the dead in 1895.

The church was used until 1926, when a new church was built in nearby Lønstrup. The old building was maintained by the National Museum of Denmark, which took possession of the church in 1952. In 1998, extensive archaeological work was undertaken on the site. The church had preservation status until 2005, when it was terminated so that the building could be dismantled. The final church service was held Easter 2008.

Lønstrup Klint is geologically unique and has lost on average 1.5 meters to erosion per year for the past 300 years. While erosion continued to threaten the church, shifting sands have been burying the Rubjerg Knude lighthouse a short distance to the south. The lighthouse operated for just a few decades, while adjacent buildings were turned into a museum about the shifting sands. A few years later, it was abandoned.

Heavy storms in the late 20th century and early 21st so harmed the coast that one corner of the church was damaged and by the mid-2000s, the sea was just 9 meters from the church. There were heated debates over what to do, whether to let nature take its course, or to take action and try to save church. Danish firms tried to protect the coast and prevent sand erosion. In August 2007, after four years of discussion, the Danish National Museum, in view of the considerable cost and local public resistance, decided to relocate the church to an open-air museum. At the end of November 2007, the authorities responsible for culture and land protection decided to dismantle the church. In autumn 2008, the roof and interior of the church were removed and put in storage; the walls were left behind. In autumn 2011, the western wall was dismantled, leaving remnants of only three walls with an open view to the sea. In summer and autumn 2012, severe erosion north and south of the site caused large chunks of land to fall into the sea. As of November 2012, the church rests a mere nine meters from the steep cliff. Authorities are monitoring the situation in order to determine if and when to dismantle more of the church.

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Details

Founded: 1250
Category: Ruins in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Emre Yıldız (2 years ago)
Nice view
Carsten Kuckuk (3 years ago)
The church, and the parts of the cemetery between the sea and the church are now (Summer 2017) gone, but the inland parts of the cemetary are still there.
Terje Theiss (3 years ago)
It encapsulates living on the edge.
Peter Vang Christensen (3 years ago)
A beautiful place. Recently the church has been removed but most of the graves are still there.
Sascha Tayefeh (6 years ago)
A beautiful place, must visit when you're there.
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