Östra Ryd Church

Östra Ryd, Sweden

Östra Ryd Church was built around the year 1300 and the nave and vaults were constructed around 1430. The church was rebuilt completely in the 1700s, when the tower was added. The altar screen is made of oak in 1488. The limestone font dates from the mid-1200s and wooden cruficixes from the 1400s. There is also a chapel of Brahe family, added in 1690-1693. They donated lot of valuable inventory to Östra Ryd church, most of them were war trophies from the Thirty Years' War.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: c. 1300
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Martin Eriksson (6 months ago)
Mycket fin kyrka med anor från Gustav Vasas tod
Arvid Venngren (6 months ago)
Jättefin liten landsbygdskyrka
Gustav Frosteblad (7 months ago)
Wow vilken konstskatt
Heiko (8 months ago)
Hübsche Kirche. Im Vorraum gibt es 2 Runensteine. Leider ist die Kirche dauernd geschlossen.
Lorena Gustafsson (2 years ago)
It's a place were I feel peace and tranquillity.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kerameikos

Kerameikos was the potters" quarter of the city, from which the English word 'ceramic' is derived, and was also the site of an important cemetery and numerous funerary sculptures erected along the road out of the city towards Eleusis.

The earliest tombs at the Kerameikos date from the Early Bronze Age (2700-2000 BC), and the cemetery appears to have continuously expanded from the sub-Mycenaean period (1100-1000 BC). In the Geometric (1000-700 BC) and Archaic periods (700-480 BC) the number of tombs increased; they were arranged inside tumuli or marked by funerary monuments. The cemetery was used incessantly from the Hellenistic period until the Early Christian period (338 BC until approximately the sixth century AD).

The most important Athenian vases come from the tombs of the Kerameikos. Among them is the famous “Dipylon Oinochoe”, which bears the earliest inscription written in the Greek alphabet (second half of the eighth century BC). The site"s small museum houses the finds from the Kerameikos excavations.