Klekkende Høj

Askeby, Denmark

Klekkende Høj is a megalithic tomb which dates possibly from the Neolithic Age, ca. 4500 years ago. It one of the best preserved of more than 100 burial mounds on the island. The tomb is a passage grave, which means that the central chamber within the mound is reached by a connecting passage. Klekkende Høj is unusual in that there are two entrance passages running approximately parallel to each other, facing east. Within the mound is a central space running approximately north-south, which is divided through the centre by two large stones. One passage enters each half of the tomb. The entrance passages are approximately 7 metres long and sufficiently large for a crouching man. The central chambers are each approximately 4.5 metres long and larger, but not large enough for a man to stand. The chambers and passages are constructed from large stones set on edge, which support capstones laid flat across their tops. The whole was then covered by an earth mound.

The tomb was excavated in 1797 by Antoine de Bosc de la Calmette, who was governor of the island. Fifteen men worked for a week to dig down into the tomb and remove some of the capstones so that the contents could be removed. Inside were a considerable number of human remains, flint weapons, clay vessels and amber jewellery. These were sent to the National Museum of Denmark in Copenhagen. The tomb was then re-sealed.

The tomb has since been entered again and is now open to the public via the passage entrances. The southern chamber was restored in 1987 to make it safe. At that time, the northern chamber was considered to be sound, but it was later found that the capstones were in danger of slipping off their supports. This was restored in 2002, and electric light was also installed for the benefit of visitors.

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Details

Founded: 3300-3200 BC
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Denmark
Historical period: Neolithic Age (Denmark)

More Information

da.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anja Becker (5 months ago)
One of the most impressive barrows. A great surprise is waiting inside :)
Katrin “K.” M (2 years ago)
Klekkende Hoi is a walk-in burial mound. As an adult you come crawling or in a squatting step. The tomb is terraced and has 2 burial chambers, each with its own entrance. Inside, skeletons (remnants), pottery, daggers etc. were exhibited behind a glass wall. The tomb is moderately lit. With additional light on mobile phone is fine.
Kai Kottmann (2 years ago)
If you are in the area, well worth a visit, especially if you are historically interested. But not a must.
Marijke Olzheim (2 years ago)
Beautiful setting, serene atmosphere.
D.C. Gruis (3 years ago)
Prachtig oud monument in het landschap dat aan belang wint door te beseffen dat het er al duizenden jaren ligt, daarmee de ouderdom van de Egyptische piramides overtreft. Uiteraard, de beschaving was van een ander soort, maar de neolithische boeren hebben dit gemaakt met een organisatorische orde die niet onderdoet voor de Egyptische, Griekse of Romeinse bouwers. Met de kennis, technieken en middelen die ze voor handen hadden is iets blijvends gemaakt en hebben ze iets nagelaten aan ons: naast het monument ook stof tot nadenken.
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