Grønsalen or Grønjægers Høj is about 100 metres long and 10 metres wide, which makes it Denmark's largest long barrow and is widely recognised as one of Europe's outstanding ancient monuments. The barrow, rising over a metre above the surrounding area, is encircled by 134 large stones. The grave, at the centre, is covered with earth and contains three burial chambers, two of which are open. It is not known when they were first opened or what was found inside. The long barrow was examined in 1810 by Bishop Münter and was protected by law after that. On the basis of its shape, the barrow has been dated as Neolithic, approximately 3500 BC. The first historical reference to the site was in ca. 1186 when it was called Grónesund.

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Lammehavevej 6, Askeby, Denmark
See all sites in Askeby

Details

Founded: 3500 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Denmark
Historical period: Neolithic Age (Denmark)

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Agnieszka S (2 years ago)
Jak przed kilku tysięcy lat ładnie zachowany.
D.C. Gruis (2 years ago)
Prachtig oud monument in het landschap dat aan belang wint door te beseffen dat het er al duizenden jaren ligt, daarmee de ouderdom van de Egyptische piramides overtreft. Uiteraard, de beschaving was van een ander soort, maar de neolithische boeren hebben dit gemaakt met een organisatorische orde die niet onderdoet voor de Egyptische, Griekse of Romeinse bouwers. Met de kennis, technieken en middelen die ze voor handen hadden is iets blijvends gemaakt en hebben ze iets nagelaten aan ons: naast het monument ook stof tot nadenken.
Benjamin Jacobsen (2 years ago)
Skøn beliggenhed, vejbod med div. grøntsager, æg på gården og alt er self. økologisk. God dag
Steen Knarberg Photography (2 years ago)
Fænomenalt oldtidsmonument, må være blandt de aller største...
Geoffrey Smith (3 years ago)
Extremely well preserved megalithic long barrow.
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