The Haga dolmen (Hagadösen) is a megalithic dolmen, dating from the Neolithic era. It is located on the island of Orust in Bohuslän, about one kilometre to the east of Tegneby Church. Not far from the dolmen is a second, smaller one, and about 250 metres west of it a large passage grave can be found.

The grave consists of four raised stone slabs, with a fifth slab placed as a roof, with an additional threshold stone by the entry and a stepping stone. It is surrounded by a small mound of earth, and some barely visible edge stones. While small in size, the dolmen has the province's largest inside chamber. It has a rough dating of about 3400 BCE.

Several artefacts were found during an archaeological excavation in 1915 by Arvid Enqvist, among them an amber necklace, a stone axe, a flint knife, and some slate jewellery. These finds were dated to the late Neolithic. No grave finds from the dolmen's primary period, the early Neolithic, have been discovered. The neighbouring dolmen was also excavated at this time.

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Mällby 520, Orust, Sweden
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Details

Founded: 3400 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Sweden
Historical period: Neolithic Age (Sweden)

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