Bregninge Church was originally a Romanesque church from the 1200s with monumental Gothic arches built in the late 1400s. The impressive steeple of the tower (characteristic of eastern Slesvig) is covered with oak shingles. The frescoes from c. 1510 were uncovered 1915-22 and most recently restored in 1956. Outstanding triptych dates from the early 1500s. It was created by the famous master Claus Berg. The roof dates from late Middle Ages. The pulpit is in Renaissance style (1612). The northern entry to the churchyard is provided with a cattle grid.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

More Information

www.visitdenmark.fi

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gert Olsen (2 years ago)
Impressive place
Erik Tvedskov (2 years ago)
Beautiful Church buckles altarpiece
Johnna Christiansen (2 years ago)
Always sweet service and the nicest and cleanest Net I have ever experienced.
Tony McCormick (3 years ago)
Not worth the drive. Yes it is from 1250 and it does does have a special "triptych" altar, and special painted walls, but I was disappointed.
Marlene H. A. Filipsen (3 years ago)
Beautiful church with frescoes and a nice altarpiece. Really nice cemetery
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