It has been suggested that Grouville Church was consecrated in 1322, but the first written record of the church dates from 1149. It comprises a nave and chancel with two transepts, or rather aisles and a central tower, surmounted by a quadrilateral broach spire. The west end of the nave, which is undoubtedly the oldest portion of the church, probably dates from the 12th century, and still contains many water-worn stones, laboriously conveyed from the neighbouring sea beach for its construction. In plan, this church differs from the form characteristic of most Jersey churches, which usually consists of a chancel and long nave, with short transepts. It, however, does not depart altogether from the cruciform plan, inasmuch as the aisles, running parallel with the chancel, may be regarded as substitutes for a transept.

The traditional date of consecration, 1322 AD, probably applies to the completion of the chancel, tower, and spire. These were added in the late 14th or early 15th century, chiefly through the generosity of the Mallet family, whose bearing (3 buckles) is probably represented on the gable south of the east window, in proximity to a patriarchal or 'trefide' cross.

Should this supposition be correct this stone would have been inserted at the time of the enlargement of the church by the Mallet family. This family held the 'Fief and Seigneurie de la Malletiere' in the parish of Grouville, as far back as the reign of King John in the 12th century. The aisles, or chapels, adjoining the chancel are of late 15th century date.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

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4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Verity Le Brun (3 years ago)
Not my church, and my first visit, but the people there very welcoming indeed, which is the Christian ethos, thank you.
Sonja Latimer (3 years ago)
Well decorated church, new carpet, colourful windows. Very welcoming and friendly. Lots of information about church building and history available.
Staniław Duszkiewicz (4 years ago)
Oki
Alaistair Jerrom-Smith (5 years ago)
Lovely parish church. Good range of services
Yvonne McClinton (7 years ago)
Beautiful
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