The construction of the Fort Regent fortress we see today began on 7 November 1806, during the Napoleonic Wars, with the laying of a foundation stone by George Don the Lieutenant Governor of Jersey. The fort was built using local workers and men from the Royal Engineers, with an average of 800 men working at any given time. This enabled the substantial amount of work to be completed 8 years later, in 1814. It was given the name Fort Regent in honour of Prince Regent, who was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland at this time. The design of the fort is credited to Lieutenant-General John Humfrey, and it is thought that Lieutenant-Colonel John Evelegh would have also worked on the final plans. The fort's main features are substantial curtain walls, ditches, a glacis, redoubts, bastions, and redans (or demi-bastions). There was a parade ground in the centre, which is now built upon, and covered with a roof.

During the Occupation of the Channel Islands the German forces made some additions to the fort including flak cannons. Some of these concrete structures remain today. In December 1967 the States of Jersey made a decision to adapt the site into a leisure centre.

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Founded: 1814
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Linda Gunner (19 months ago)
Like it here but could be made so much better like it used to be
Jonathan Sidebottom (2 years ago)
Used to be great but now left to ruin. Shame.
OMG Kate (2 years ago)
Me and my friend went ice skating there, it was really fun, we enjoyed ourselves so much! They have a cafe right by the rink, and the staff always pay attention to what is happening around them so if someone is injured, they'll get to them as soon as they can.
David Hawksworth (2 years ago)
Used to be more to do bit it has its plus so mustn't grumble.
Richard Newall (2 years ago)
Love taking my kids the jungle jim here. Just wish we could swim here like we could when I was a kid.
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