Fort Grey is a Martello tower located on a rock in Rocquaine Bay. It was previously the site of local witches' Sabbaths. The existing fort, with its white tower was originally built as a defence by the British in 1804 during the Napoleonic Wars, it was named after Charles Grey, 1st Earl Grey, who was Governor of Guernsey from 1797 to 1807.

The Fort Grey tower, like the other two Guernsey Martello towers, Fort Saumarez and Fort Hommet, was intended as a keep for the battery in which it was placed. The Guernsey Martellos are smaller than the British towers, with the Fort Saumarez and Fort Hommet towers being smaller than the Fort Grey tower. Each mounted a 24-pounder carronade on the roof to protect the battery. Fort Saumarez and Fort Hommet also have exterior staircases up to the second floor. The War Office in London sold Fort Grey to the States of Guernsey in 1891 for £185.

During the Occupation of the Channel Islands in World War II, the Germans occupied the fort, as they did most of the other fortifications in Guernsey. More recently Fort Grey has been adapted for other more peaceful uses and now operates as a local shipwreck museum, housing a number of items of marine salvage from famous wrecks, including the MV Prosperity and Elwood Mead. The items also include a cannon from HMS Boreas that points towards the nearby Hanois rocks where Boreas sank in 1807 with the loss of her captain, at least half her crew, and possibly the captain's wife.

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Founded: 1804
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Derek Sherrington (8 months ago)
Superb small but very full museum, lots of one off exhibition material. Excellent information panels as well as supporting photographs. Outside has more exhibits as well as the excellent local views. Very glad we went, made use of the Discovery Pass which is fantastic value.
Patricia Dear (10 months ago)
Very interesting spot providing a wealth of information on the islands marine history.
Paul Kent (11 months ago)
Small shipwreck museum in an interesting setting. Very helpful and attentive staff.
John Merrien (12 months ago)
An authentic representation of the suffering from the numerous wrecks around Guernsey's coast. The Roman Wreck & Guernsey Pearl over the road are also brilliant. Perhaps Guernsey's best carvery on a Sunday.
Dave Dome (15 months ago)
Great views and excellent location for walking. Museum is small but perfectly formed, with info on the shipwrecks in the area. Also the Roman ship found in the harbour is viewable across the road by the Pearl centre, where there is also a good cafe for refreshments. A must visit if you are in the area.
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