The Little Chapel created in July 1914 by Brother Déodat. He planned to create a miniature version of the grotto and basilica at Lourdes, the Rosary Basilica. It has been said that it is the smallest functioning chapel in Europe, if not the world, and it is believed to be the world’s smallest consecrated church.

The chapel was originally 9 feet long by 4.5 feet wide. After taking criticism from other brothers Déodat demolished the chapel. He finished a second chapel in July 1914 (measuring 9 feet by 6 feet). However, when the Bishop of Portsmouth visited in 1923, he could not fit through the door, so Déodat again demolished it. The third and current version of the chapel started soon after the last demolition, and measures 16 feet by 9 feet. Déodat went to France in 1939 and died there, never having seen his chapel finished.

The chapel was brought sudden fame following a Daily Mirror article, which led to islanders donating coloured china, the Lieutenant-Governor of the island offered mother of pearl, and other gifts came from around the globe.

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Founded: 1914
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

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4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sonja Latimer (2 years ago)
Smallest chapel I've ever seen. Beautiful shells and colorful decoration. Pretty unique place, don't miss to stop here, worth a visit.
Isabelle Plasschaert PHOTOGRAPHER HARROW (2 years ago)
Quirky tiny chapel. Unfortunately the shop nearby wasn’t open on a Sunday in January.
Derek Lakin (3 years ago)
You can't come to Guernsey without visiting the Little Chapel! An amazing creation covered in thousands of pieces of pottery and some lovely stained glass.
Paul Chuter (3 years ago)
Remarkable visit I highly recommend.
Ross Humphries (3 years ago)
It really is worth the effort to visit this folly and especially if you have young children. There is no charge to enter the chapel though donations are welcome. If you go along to the end of the lane there are some craft shops and workshops that are also worth a visit.
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