The walls of the ancient Fishermen's Chapel are reputed to date from the middle of the 6th century, but some authorities give a later date. It is however only a few monastic chapels survived the destruction of over fifty others at the hands of the Reformers in the 16th century. The material used in the chapel is the same as was used in the parish church: limpet shells crushed and dissolved with boiling sea-water. The stone roof was raised in the 14th century. The monks of that period evidently found the roof too low and squat for wall paintings. These were discovered in 1918. After a severe storm, colour was revealed on the ceiling and a picture of the 'Assumption' was seen, but in a damaged condition. But underneath the plaster was found another painting, 'The Annunciation', of about 1310-1315 A.D. At the foot of this painting are seen fourteen figures, supposedly members of an old Jersey family, the head of which had paid for this painting.The floor was restored to its earlier level in the 1980s to the medieval level, and the 'low, squat' aspect of the chapel which appears in early photographs is now gone, as the proper proportions can be seen.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: c. 550 AD
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rod Whiting (7 months ago)
A great example of an ancient church.
Marisa Marques (13 months ago)
Sadly it wasn't open for viewings
Sandy Walls (2 years ago)
A very moving experience, beautifully maintained.
David Legg (3 years ago)
Great mural.
ray haswell (5 years ago)
lovely little chapel that can easily be missed, look out for it
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Redipuglia World War I Memorial

Redipuglia is the largest Italian Military Sacrarium. It rises up on the western front of the Monte Sei Busi, which, in the First World War was bitterly fought after because, although it was not very high, from its summit it allowed an ample range of access from the West to the first steps of the Karstic table area.

The monumental staircase on which the remains of one hundred thousand fallen soldiers are lined up and which has at its base the monolith of the Duke of Aosta, who was the commanding officer of the third Brigade, and gives an image of a military grouping in the field of a Great Unity with its Commanding Officer at the front. The mortal remains of 100,187 fallen soldiers lie here, 39,857 of them identified and 60,330 unknown.