The walls of the ancient Fishermen's Chapel are reputed to date from the middle of the 6th century, but some authorities give a later date. It is however only a few monastic chapels survived the destruction of over fifty others at the hands of the Reformers in the 16th century. The material used in the chapel is the same as was used in the parish church: limpet shells crushed and dissolved with boiling sea-water. The stone roof was raised in the 14th century. The monks of that period evidently found the roof too low and squat for wall paintings. These were discovered in 1918. After a severe storm, colour was revealed on the ceiling and a picture of the 'Assumption' was seen, but in a damaged condition. But underneath the plaster was found another painting, 'The Annunciation', of about 1310-1315 A.D. At the foot of this painting are seen fourteen figures, supposedly members of an old Jersey family, the head of which had paid for this painting.The floor was restored to its earlier level in the 1980s to the medieval level, and the 'low, squat' aspect of the chapel which appears in early photographs is now gone, as the proper proportions can be seen.

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Founded: c. 550 AD
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

ray haswell (3 years ago)
lovely little chapel that can easily be missed, look out for it
jacek błażejczak (4 years ago)
Piękna średniowieczna świątynia.
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