Le Trépied is a prehistoric passage grave built during the Neolithic period (4000 to 2500 BC). It is a single chamber tomb, 5.5 metres in length and two metres at its widest point with three capstones, one of which was returned to its original position in the 1870s after it had fallen off.

Excavations in 1840 discovered pottery and flint arrowheads dating to 1800BC showing that the site was still in use then. The tomb was repeatedly mentioned in the 17th century witch trials as a meeting place for witches and as the venue for the sabbats. One story says that the witches used to perform chants mocking the Virgin Mary whose shrine of Notre Dame de Lihou once stood on the nearby island which can be seen from the headland where the tomb stands.

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Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.