Château du Champ de Bataille

Sainte-Opportune-du-Bosc, France

Château du Champ-de-Bataille is Baroque castle built in the 17th century for the Maréchal de Créqui. In 1650 Alexandre de Créquy-Bernieulle (1628–1703) was arrested and exiled to the province by Cardinal Mazarin. He built the Château du Champ-de-Bataille between 1653 and 1665.

The French formal garden was created beginning in 1992 by a new owner, interior designer Jacques Garcia. It was inspired by sketches of the original garden, long vanished, which showed the placement of the great terrace, the broderies and bousquets, and the proportions of the squares of Apollo and Diana. These features were scrupulously reproduced, while the new features of the garden took their 'measure and tone' from the model of the original. The garden is listed by the French Ministry of Culture as one of the Notable Gardens of France.

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Founded: 1653-1655
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

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User Reviews

Gilles Stanek (3 years ago)
A lovely XVIIth century castle, surrounded by very diverse lavish gardens, some with exotic cultural references, containing a large array of water fountains, columns and statues. Among these, a stunningly beautiful tropical greenhouse. Within the castle building itself, numerous collection items of stuffed animals and insects are to be found on the ground floor, added to appealing stylish bedroom and livingroom furniture, carpets, tapestries, and paintings on the first floor, all belonging to the classical, baroque and rococo periods, most pleasing to the eye. The entrance fee may seem somewhat expensive indeed, yet the visit is well worth making. About three hours or so should suffice to take in the beauty of this location.
Shawn Thomas (3 years ago)
Beautiful chateau! The reasons I love Normandy. Great place to take pictures.
Alison Richards (3 years ago)
Visited the Gardens only, it was so expensive to visit both gardens and chateau. Lovely gardens though, well worth a visit. Apparently there's a Michelin 2-starred restaurant in the chateau as well!
Андрей Ганнесен (3 years ago)
Nice place to visit, really small Versailles in Normandy. Very beautiful garden and chateau. But price of visit is a bit too high, I think - 15 E for garden and 30 E for chateau+garden. And restaurant is expensive also. In shop there are no souvenir magnets, pity
Marc Aurèle (3 years ago)
I was not suspecting to find such an interesting place in Normandy. One of the very rare privately owned château in France. Furniture is exquisite and the immense park just amazing. While this is not Versailles, this time capsule of a place is worth the 2 hour drive from Paris.
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