Collegiate Church Notre-Dame

Vernon, France

The Notre Dame Church Collegiate is considered one of the most beautiful examples of medieval architecture in France. Built between the 11th and 16th century, the collegiate contains different architectural styles. Where the altar and the transept are Romanesque style, the rest of the building was rebuilt in three different Gothic (namely Early, Flamboyant and Perpendicular Gothic) styles. The organs date back to the beginning of the 17th century and which was restored in 1979. Some magnificent abstract-style stained glass windows were inserted in the 1970’s to replace those destroyed during World War II.

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Details

Founded: 1072
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Francesca Tonnnelier Lassiaz (12 months ago)
j aime cet endroit parce que j y ai été baptisé. Le lieu est calme malgré la soufflerie du chauffage. Elle mériterait plus d'éclairages et de chaises dans un endroit ou deux.
Dominique Massif (2 years ago)
Monument incontournable de la ville de Vernon. Malheureusement ce bâtiment se détériore. Participez à sa sauvegarde. Visitez la mairie située en face et dirigez-vous vers le musée.
Matt Hollings (2 years ago)
It's a church and serves as a reminder of your place in society.
Lea Mullis (2 years ago)
An awesome and beautiful experience. A dream to have the opportunity to visit and not disappointed.
Cheri V (3 years ago)
Gothic and Romanesque dating from 11-16th centuries. Pipe organ from 1600!
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