Château de la Madeleine

Pressagny-l'Orgueilleux, France

Château de la Madeleine was originally built in 1129 by St. Adjutor (the patron saint of the river sailors, who died in 1131) and it was dedicated to Mary Magdalene. There is only one wall left to the west of the property. In 1407 a monk named Jean le Vigneron probably built a new castle and priory to the same site. The priory called 'priory of La Madeleine' remained church property until 1789, when it was confiscated. The property was purchased by an officer of the Empire, General de Bremont, married to a Pomeranian princess.

Casimir de la Vigne, a great 19th century century poet and playwright, then becomes the owner of the house. In 1849, the wealthy Baron Thenard, inventor of hydrogen peroxide, purchased the property, but died three years later, without having had time to start the renovations. His widow and daughter, having traveled throughout Europe, launched out into considerable works to give the castle its present appearance, combining baroque and rococo elements.

The Thénard family retained ownership until the early twentieth century. In 1924, the furnishings of the Castle were put up for auction and the castle was sold to M. Gianotti, architect of the Maginot Line. The latter added his personal touch to the Madeleine by building the far right wing of the castle, rightfully called 'the bunker', and his wife obtained the listing of the park with its 120 rare essences.

During World War II, the property was used as a school, a summer camp, but also as a resting place for the German Kriegsmarine. In 1945, when the Allied troops crossed the Seine at Vernon, the castle park was the scene of heavy fighting, in which seven Englishmen were killed.

After the war, the property was bought up by M. Lebrejal who restored the chapel. In 1960, the Lebrejals resold it to the Drouot firm who wanted to make a nursing home and a housing development in the woods. But as the site is classified, this housing estate project was banned, and la Madeleine was left in neglect.

In 1980 the Clermont couple fell in love with the place and acquired it. On her death in 1989, Claude-Marie was buried in the park and her husband Jean-Pierre continued the adventure. In March 2000, the castle became the property of his sons Paul Stephane and Olivier who have been restoring it since then.

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Details

Founded: 1129
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

www.chateau-madeleine.com

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

P Bison (3 years ago)
We booked the "best room" for our honey moon. Unfortunately the ceiling was dilpidated. But worst of all, the owner was an obnoxious host, a very rude and dishonest person. My young wife is very disapointed, it had to be a dream night and it will ultimately be an unpleasant memory.
櫻桃子 (3 years ago)
We stayed on August 15, 2018, breakfast was delicious, and the host was great too, we will come again
Tracey Barker (5 years ago)
What a fabulous place to stay! We arrived quite late armed with a picnic and the lovely owners set the table on the terrace for us, what a treat. The rooms were just amazing, wish we could have stayed longer to enjoy them more. Breakfast just lovely too. Had a walk to the river in the morning. Look out for the underground tunnel! Very beautiful chateau. Lovely owners. Thank you for a lovely stay.
susan watkins (5 years ago)
Charming place. Hosts were very helpful. Lovely old building yet modern plumbing very welcome. Lovely grounds. 10 minute drive to Monet garden.
bjørn tommy Johansen (6 years ago)
Spectacular castle and surroundings. Nice rooms.
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