Château de la Madeleine was originally built in 1129 by St. Adjutor (the patron saint of the river sailors, who died in 1131) and it was dedicated to Mary Magdalene. There is only one wall left to the west of the property. In 1407 a monk named Jean le Vigneron probably built a new castle and priory to the same site. The priory called 'priory of La Madeleine' remained church property until 1789, when it was confiscated. The property was purchased by an officer of the Empire, General de Bremont, married to a Pomeranian princess.

Casimir de la Vigne, a great 19th century century poet and playwright, then becomes the owner of the house. In 1849, the wealthy Baron Thenard, inventor of hydrogen peroxide, purchased the property, but died three years later, without having had time to start the renovations. His widow and daughter, having traveled throughout Europe, launched out into considerable works to give the castle its present appearance, combining baroque and rococo elements.

The Thénard family retained ownership until the early twentieth century. In 1924, the furnishings of the Castle were put up for auction and the castle was sold to M. Gianotti, architect of the Maginot Line. The latter added his personal touch to the Madeleine by building the far right wing of the castle, rightfully called 'the bunker', and his wife obtained the listing of the park with its 120 rare essences.

During World War II, the property was used as a school, a summer camp, but also as a resting place for the German Kriegsmarine. In 1945, when the Allied troops crossed the Seine at Vernon, the castle park was the scene of heavy fighting, in which seven Englishmen were killed.

After the war, the property was bought up by M. Lebrejal who restored the chapel. In 1960, the Lebrejals resold it to the Drouot firm who wanted to make a nursing home and a housing development in the woods. But as the site is classified, this housing estate project was banned, and la Madeleine was left in neglect.

In 1980 the Clermont couple fell in love with the place and acquired it. On her death in 1989, Claude-Marie was buried in the park and her husband Jean-Pierre continued the adventure. In March 2000, the castle became the property of his sons Paul Stephane and Olivier who have been restoring it since then.

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Details

Founded: 1129
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

www.chateau-madeleine.com

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

bjørn tommy Johansen (2 years ago)
Spectacular castle and surroundings. Nice rooms.
alberto bettin (2 years ago)
Probably is the best place I've never been in my life. A poetry as like in 19th century. Magic. A breathless landscape. Paul and his family are really kind and funny. Breakfast in the morning could be the same in a royal house. Beautiful. Awesome. Can't wait to come back for more days.
Laurent Gouel (2 years ago)
Magnifique Château, chambres d'hôtes vastes, très bon accueil
אילן שנהב (3 years ago)
Nothing except good breakfast. The place is neglected.
Carole M (3 years ago)
Superbe vue sur la Seine. Propriétaire très sympathique et prévenant. Vaut le détour
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