Champ-Dolent Menhir

Dol-de-Bretagne, France

The menhir, or upright standing stone, of Champ Dolent is the largest standing stone in Brittany. It is located in a field outside the town of Dol-de-Bretagne, and is nearly 9 meters high. The stone was taken from a site 4 kilometers away. It has a smaller polished stone at its base.

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User Reviews

Nicole E (12 months ago)
It's a very big and mysterious standing stone. Great if you like that sort of thing.
Vivien Black (12 months ago)
Beautiful, peaceful place to visit. Visitors trickled in and stayed only a short time. Picnic benches available. Very limited parking on the side of the road but wasn't a problem for us. Visited early. In awe with the time the stone was placed there. So hard to comprehend. Left with many questions!
Kei growsclover (12 months ago)
The Menhir de Champ-Dolent... That was certainly something different than the usual tourist experiences. First of all the Menhir is literally in the middle of nowhere... and that's a good thing. Being located inside someone's farming field you have to trespass to actually visit it
Franziska Kauffmann-Zappe (13 months ago)
Impressive menhir in the country side surrounded by fields. Not at all a touristy place ...
Brian Mooney (13 months ago)
Nice to see with a couple of picnic tables but you won't spend more than 10 mins here...
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