Champ-Dolent Menhir

Dol-de-Bretagne, France

The menhir, or upright standing stone, of Champ Dolent is the largest standing stone in Brittany. It is located in a field outside the town of Dol-de-Bretagne, and is nearly 9 meters high. The stone was taken from a site 4 kilometers away. It has a smaller polished stone at its base.

It is not precisely dated, but recent scholarship suggests that Brittany's menhirs were erected c. 5000-4000 BC.

According to legend, the menhir fell from the skies to separate two feuding brothers who were on the point of killing each other. This legend is said to account for the name "Champ Dolent" which means "Field of Sorrow". In reality, the word dolent is more likely to derive from Breton dolenn ("meadow").

Another legend states that the menhir is slowly sinking into the ground, and the world will end when it disappears altogether.

According to tradition, in the year 560 Chlothar I, King of the Franks, is said to have met his rebel son, Chram, here.

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Details

Founded: 5000-4000 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Prehistoric Age (France)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Noah Melis (9 months ago)
Great men here. The stone is nice too!
Kees Stolker (9 months ago)
It's not much, but it is very old. There is a sign explaining the history. Voor for a quick visit if you are passing anyway.
Bram Groenen (10 months ago)
More like Mêh-nir ?
Tomáš Jevočin (11 months ago)
Yep, it's a big rock. Very nice one though.
Graeme Stewart (2 years ago)
Super wee spot to stop and admire this neolithic Menhir
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