Champ-Dolent Menhir

Dol-de-Bretagne, France

The menhir, or upright standing stone, of Champ Dolent is the largest standing stone in Brittany. It is located in a field outside the town of Dol-de-Bretagne, and is nearly 9 meters high. The stone was taken from a site 4 kilometers away. It has a smaller polished stone at its base.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



User Reviews

Nicole E (8 months ago)
It's a very big and mysterious standing stone. Great if you like that sort of thing.
Vivien Black (8 months ago)
Beautiful, peaceful place to visit. Visitors trickled in and stayed only a short time. Picnic benches available. Very limited parking on the side of the road but wasn't a problem for us. Visited early. In awe with the time the stone was placed there. So hard to comprehend. Left with many questions!
Kei growsclover (8 months ago)
The Menhir de Champ-Dolent... That was certainly something different than the usual tourist experiences. First of all the Menhir is literally in the middle of nowhere... and that's a good thing. Being located inside someone's farming field you have to trespass to actually visit it
Franziska Kauffmann-Zappe (9 months ago)
Impressive menhir in the country side surrounded by fields. Not at all a touristy place ...
Brian Mooney (9 months ago)
Nice to see with a couple of picnic tables but you won't spend more than 10 mins here...
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Cháteau Comtal

The Château Comtal (Count’s Castle) is a medieval castle within the Cité of Carcassonne, the largest city in Europe with its city walls still intact. The Château Comtal has a strong claim to be called a 'Cathar Castle'. When the Catholic Crusader army arrived in 1209 they first attacked Raymond-Roger Trencavel's castrum at Bèziers and then moved on to his main stronghold at Carcassonne.

The castle with rectangular shape is separated from the city by a deep ditch and defended by two barbicans. There are six towers curtain walls.

The castle was restored in 1853 by the architect Eugène Viollet-le-Duc. It was added to the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites in 1997.