Champ-Dolent Menhir

Dol-de-Bretagne, France

The menhir, or upright standing stone, of Champ Dolent is the largest standing stone in Brittany. It is located in a field outside the town of Dol-de-Bretagne, and is nearly 9 meters high. The stone was taken from a site 4 kilometers away. It has a smaller polished stone at its base.

It is not precisely dated, but recent scholarship suggests that Brittany's menhirs were erected c. 5000-4000 BC.

According to legend, the menhir fell from the skies to separate two feuding brothers who were on the point of killing each other. This legend is said to account for the name "Champ Dolent" which means "Field of Sorrow". In reality, the word dolent is more likely to derive from Breton dolenn ("meadow").

Another legend states that the menhir is slowly sinking into the ground, and the world will end when it disappears altogether.

According to tradition, in the year 560 Chlothar I, King of the Franks, is said to have met his rebel son, Chram, here.

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Details

Founded: 5000-4000 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Prehistoric Age (France)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tomáš Jevočin (2 months ago)
Yep, it's a big rock. Very nice one though.
Graeme Stewart (12 months ago)
Super wee spot to stop and admire this neolithic Menhir
T Los (12 months ago)
The 4 picnic tables are a nice addition to the place, good spot to make a stop.
Dirk Cleenwerck (13 months ago)
An old menhir in the middle of the fields. Makes you wonder why people in times long gone put that much effort in raising up one of these stone giants.
Julie Dion (15 months ago)
It is the largest standing stone in Brittany at 9 metres high near to the town of Dol de Bretagne. Defiantly worth a stop. There are also picnic benches and information panels.
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