With its majestic main courtyard and its outbuildings, the Château de Cany still evokes the austere splendor of Louis XIII. It was built between 1640 and 1646 by François Mansart. It still preserves its old furnishing and is today a hotel.

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Founded: 1640-1646
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Chrystelle Baudry (4 years ago)
Magnifique mais nous n avons pas pu visiter
paul.bira@gmail.com Paul (4 years ago)
Locație f.frumoasa cu un parc imens dar castelul si nici proprietatea nu le -- am putut vedea ,programul fiind Aprilie- Augist
Robert Villard (4 years ago)
Visite sympa beau château. Mais seulement la visite du parc possible.
W Dijkstra (4 years ago)
Heel erg mooi, leuk verhaal bij het chateau.
Mistery Man (4 years ago)
Wunderschöner Park, er passt gut zu den Schloss das wir leider nicht besichtigen konnten da dies renoviert wird allerdings macht es einen guten Eindruck. Die Führung nur durch den Park kostete 2,50€ was nach meinem Ermessen vollkommen in Ordnung ist.
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Château d'Olhain

The Château d'Olhain is probably the most famous castle of the Artois region. It is located in the middle of a lake which reflects its picturesque towers and curtain walls. It was also a major stronghold for the Artois in medieval times and testimony to the power of the Olhain family, first mentioned from the 12th century.

The existence of the castle was known early in the 13th century, but the present construction is largely the work of Jean de Nielles, who married Marie d’Olhain at the end of the 15th century.

The marriage of Alix Nielles to Jean de Berghes, Grand Veneur de France (master of hounds) to the King, meant the castle passed to this family, who kept it for more than 450 years. Once confiscated by Charles Quint, it suffered during the wars that ravaged the Artois. Besieged in 1641 by the French, it was partly demolished by the Spaniards in 1654, and finally blown-up and taken by the Dutch in 1710. Restored in 1830, it was abandoned after 1870, and sold by the last Prince of Berghes in 1900. There is also evidence that one of the castles occupants was related to Charles de Batz-Castelmore d'Artagnan, the person Alexandre Dumas based his Three Musketeers charictor d'Artagnan on.

During the World War I and World War II, the castle was requisitioned first by French troops, then Canadian and British soldiers. The current owner has restored the castle to its former glory.