Château du Taillis

Duclair, France

Château du Taillis was built in 1530 by Jehan du Fay du Tailly in an Italian Renaissance style on the foundations of a fortified mansion of the 13th century. It was extended between the 17th and the 18th century. The castle has a beautiful large park with a chapel dating from the 16th century.

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Founded: 1530
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

deedee ephestion (8 months ago)
Pour le marché de noël, petit pour le prix d'entré
Jonathan Egouy (11 months ago)
Ce n'est pas la première fois que j'y vais, pour la première fois nous avons eu le droit à une visite avec le propriétaire. C'était particulier, je recommande ce site!
Vladislav Bokachev (13 months ago)
Great place, but took a lot of time to get there, because there are three chateau with the same name and different adresses. So you will enjoy a nice road puzzle, which I think only adds to the experience. Once we got there we found a lot of parking space because only one parking space was taken up by a rusty boat, left here by the previous visitors in 1944. After parking we proceded to the chateau, where we were met by the caretaker who was looking at us from the window with a somewhat surprised look. After our inquaries as to the location of the museum, told us to wait for him a bit. And so we did. Which I then realise was one of the best decisions of my life. We then walked to a stunning wooden house where after walking up the stairs where we were greeted by the sound of WW2 music, small ticket office and a small gift shop. The gift shop was small but still was on the same level as other gift shops we have seen while travelling through France. The ticket price was a bit to high for us as we have managed to see the whole of the museum from the ticket office. I also must mention that we didn't have to wait in a long line as was noted in some comments we have read. It's a great place that you should deffinatley visit if you are staying in Rouen for more than one night. The only downside was there were no trucks and cars from WW2 era, as they were there only on weekends on May 6 - 8. But we didn't consider this to much of a problem as even without them the experience was amazing.
Stephen Pearson (14 months ago)
Spent a magical evening here when there were 2200 candles lit throughout the gardens
Fredo FERMANEL (16 months ago)
Escape game !!!
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