Lyytikkälä Farm Museum

Suomenniemi, Finland

Lyytikkälä is a Southeast Finnish farming estate that has been in the same family for more than 250 years. Owing to this, the buildings, structures and the interior of the farmhouse have largely remained unaltered. Most of 20 buildings were built between the end of 18th century and the beginning of 20th century. Lyytikkälä is therefore a valuable historic example of the lifestyle and working environment of the common people.

Ethnological films were already shot at Lyytikkälä in the 1960s. Three films on life and traditional farm work at Suomenniemi were prepared in 1962 and 1963.

At present, the care and maintenance of the Lyytikkälä farmhouse are jointly managed by the National Board of Antiquities and the Lyytikkälä farm trust. Today the museum is open in summer season.

Reference: National Board of Antiques

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Details

Founded: 18th-20th centuries
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mika Uronen (10 months ago)
Kiva
Matti Valkonen (11 months ago)
Mielenkiintoinen
Lasse Holm (12 months ago)
Hieno pala historiaa, jossa pääsee tutustumaan elämään 1700-luvulla ja sukuun, joka paikan aikoinaan omisti. Lisäksi on mahdollista tutustua sen aikaiseen hirsirakentamisperinteeseen ja nähdä jopa pala hirsirakentamisen evoluutiota, kuinka se on vuosisatojen saatossa muuttunut. Opastettu kierros on edullinen ja erittäin kattava. Pyörätuolilla liikkumiseen suositellaan avustajaa, mutta liikkuminen pihapiirissä ja kohteissa on mahdollista.
Kauko Rantala (12 months ago)
Oikein mukava paikka muistella entis ajan elämää mukavan emännän kanssa kahvetta juuen ja huiko palaa nauttien olihan siell aika iso tupa n90 neliömeetriä
Tuija Toiviainen (2 years ago)
Erinomainen opastus ja vaikuttava kokonaisuus, vierähti pari tuntia kuin siivillä.
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