Infantry Museum

Mikkeli, Finland

The Infantry Museum, founded in 1982, is housed in three wooden barracks built in the 19th century. The exhibition includes 70 different military uniforms, 120 hand guns, 20 machine and light machine guns, 20 mortars and guns, and plenty of other military equipment. The exhibition is supplemented by a large collection of photos, also in colour, and scale models depicting the battles of Tuulos and Ihantala.

The task of the museum, maintained by the Infantry Foundation, is to collect, store, examine and put on display military material which has belonged to the infantry. The exhibits are either donations made by private individuals, or articles lent by the War Museum.

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Details

Founded: 1982
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

André De Beaumont (2 years ago)
It s a nice place to visit ...i will be there ...it s a promess
Chris Horsley (2 years ago)
Really interesting place. Most of it is in Finnish, not really a surprise, but they give you a good handout in English. It deals with their modern history in a matter of fact way and does not cover anything up. Loads of great exhibits and models.
esa aho (2 years ago)
Much better than expected. Worth visiting.
Roman Lübitch (3 years ago)
Very small museum and exposition - one of very few sightseeing destinations in Mikkeli.
Juha Kuortti (3 years ago)
Excellent look on the life of infantry. The museum consists of two old barracks full of history, so reserve enough time.
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