Mikkeli Cathedral

Mikkeli, Finland

Mikkeli Cathedral was built in 1896-1897. The large red-brick church is designed by Finnish church architect Josef Stenbäck. It represents the Gothic Revival style like many other churches designed by Stenbäck. The bell tower is in the western gable of the church. The church has 1,200 seats. The organ was built in 1956 by Kangasala Organ Factory and has 51 stops. The altar painting "Crucified" was made by Pekka Halonen in 1899.

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Details

Founded: 1896-1897
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Михаил Пржевальский (5 years ago)
Собор прекрасен! Но почему он открыт только 1 час в неделю для простых смертных??!) .. Хотелось бы в нём больше проповедей,лекций, других мероприятий...)...
Oskari Juurikkala (6 years ago)
Kohtuullisen hieno mutta hieman kolkko minun makuuni... Mutta niinhän nuo tämän kauden luterilaiset kirkot tuppaavat olemaan.
poika metsälaidan (6 years ago)
Jumalan sana tule tänne
Tiina Pärnänen (6 years ago)
Kaunis kirkko erikoisella rakennushistorialla.
Damien KIENTZ (6 years ago)
Open one hour per day. Not very acceptable.
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