The Headquarters Museum

Mikkeli, Finland

The Headquarters Museum is located in one end of the Päämaja School, which is where the headquarters of the Finnish Defence Forces was located during the Winter and Continuation Wars.

The Headquarters Museum’s premises and exhibition use modern technology to display the operations of the Headquarters and central events of the WWII. The museum’s premises have been restored to the condition they were in during the war. You can view multimedia shows at the exhibition that present the central events and people of the war years.

Communications Centre Lokki is located next to the Headquarters Museum, in a cave mined into Naisvuori. The Communications Centre operated there during World War II between 1941-1944.

Mikkeli Railway Station is home to the salon car used by Mannerheim between 1939-46, office car A 90 of railway government. The wooden car was built from 1929 to 1930 and has a salon and five sleeping cabins. Mannerheim made more that 100 trips in the salon car, totalling more than 78,000 km.

Reference: The Museums of Southern Savo

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Address

Vuorikatu 14, Mikkeli, Finland
See all sites in Mikkeli

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Category: Museums in Finland

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Isaac Witherspone (2 years ago)
Nothing that special
KEN CAT (2 years ago)
It tells a lot Finnish's war history, they have "touch" screen which tourist can use it comfortably to search details. They selling books and some souvenir. Museum is just beside Päämajakoulu, so don't get lost. xD
Pasi Miettinen (2 years ago)
Interesting piece of Finnish history.
Ville Pilviö (3 years ago)
Gives a good overview of the very difficult times for Finland during WWII.
Örjan Träskböle (5 years ago)
Great. Most information is in four languages. Lots of info I didn't know before despite I'm quite informed about finnish history.
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