Savilahti Stone Sacristy

Mikkeli, Finland

Savilahti stone sacristy was originally a part of Savilahti church, which was destroyed for some reason. The sacristy was built approximately in 1520-1560 and it was planned to be the first part of new stone church. The plan was never finished because the King of Sweden confiscated parish during Reformation.

The sacristy have been used for burials and there are 22 graves under the floor. It was abandoded for a long time until renovations in 19th and 20th centuries. The sacristy is considered to be one of the oldest buildings in Savonia area.

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Details

Founded: 1520-1560
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Irma Kaivolainen (2 years ago)
I used to live next door to it and watched the chapel many times illuminated. Admittedly, embarrassingly, I never went inside.
Raimo Hämäläinen (2 years ago)
The museum closed, although the site was said to be open
Pauraa raatikainen (2 years ago)
The church museum was closed. But in the courtyard of the medieval stone chest, there was a bench and a few spruce trees in the shade of which it was nice to sit for a moment. The actual wooden church is sometimes demolished but the rocky precipice in the center of the city is a nice piece of history. The precipice is stuck in the middle of the road, ie the other side of the road in the other direction and the other. Still, the place was surprisingly calm. It must be a matter of coming to see if you can get in there, maybe in the summer.
Jimbo Bobby (2 years ago)
I ran 3576 times, but I never missed it because of the fact that you leave your car in the roof. And to get in there ??
Hannu Koistinen (3 years ago)
Mielenkiintoinen museo, ja todella hyvällä paikalla.
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