Saint Euthymius Monastery

Suzdal, Russia

The Saviour Monastery of St. Euthymius was founded in the 14th century, and grew in importance in the 16th and 17th centuries after donations by Vasili III, Ivan IV and the Pozharsky family, a noble dynasty of the region. Among the buildings erected during this period were the Assumption Church, the bell tower, the surrounding walls and towers, and the seven-domed Cathedral of the Transfiguration of the Saviour. The cathedral was built in the style of the Grand Duchy of Vladimir-Suzdal. Its interior contains restored frescoes by the school of Gury Nikitin of Kostroma, dating from 1689. The tomb of Dmitry Pozharsky lies by the cathedral wall.

The monastery also contains a prison, built in 1764, which originally housed religious dissidents. The prison continued in use during the Soviet period, and among its better known prisoners was field marshal Friedrich Paulus, who was incarcerated here for a time after his surrender at Stalingrad. The prison now houses a museum about the monastery's military history.

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Founded: 1352
Category: Religious sites in Russia

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Igor (12 months ago)
Russian antiquity, history of Russia. Suzdal was founded earlier than Vladimir. And then there was no Moscow at all.
Martin N. Held (12 months ago)
Great place and a definitely " must visit" in Suzdal.
Jenny Stones (2 years ago)
Very pretty monastery, the herb garden and photo opportunities are the highlights. You can walk around the walls and go into a small museum aswell.
Gandharva S Murthy (2 years ago)
A beautiful monastery from the ancient russian times. It's a calm and beautiful place to find peace and getting lost in to the history of Russia
Damon Huijink (2 years ago)
One of the most beautiful monasteries I’ve visited in Russia. It is very well preserved and has a long and very rich history. I was very surprised that it functioned as a prison in the Sovjet era
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