Suzdal Kremlin

Suzdal, Russia

The Suzdal Kremlin is the oldest part of the Russian city of Suzdal, dating from the 10th century. Like other Russian Kremlins, it was originally a fortress or citadel and was the religious and administrative center of the city. It is most notably the site of the Cathedral of the Nativity. Together with several structures in the neighboring city of Vladimir, it was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1992.

While archeological evidence suggests that the Suzdal Kremlin was settled as early as the 10th century, the fortress itself was built in the late 11th or early 12th century. The fortress was strategically located on a bend of the Kamenka river on three sides and a moat to the east. It was surrounded by earthen ramparts that remain to the present day. A settlement to the east became home the secular population - shopkeepers and craftsmen, while the Kremlin proper was the home of the prince, the archbishop, and the high clergy.

From the 13th to the 16th centuries, several monasteries and churches were constructed, including the Cathedral of the Nativity, the Convent of the Intercession, and the Monastery of Our Saviour and St. Euthymius.

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Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Russia

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ася Болтышева (3 months ago)
Beautiful, atmpsperic and cozy. It's simple, but you'll surely love this place of russian culture and white churches.
mira sonaco (7 months ago)
Beautiful old churches and green scenery!it's like the movie The sound of music by Julie Andrews
Sebastian William (9 months ago)
Good place to visit. Many historical buildings to see
Андрей Казаков (9 months ago)
Interesting place, history of XII-XIII centuries in front of your eyes
Nhatz Mania Igorota (2 years ago)
I just like the old structures it signifies years of endurance.
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