Buffavento Castle

Kyrenia, Cyprus

At 955m above sea level, Buffavento castle stands the highest of the three crusader castles in Cyprus. It probably originated as a Byzantine watch tower to guard against Arab raiders in the 10th century. The castle was extended during the Lusignan rule (1192–1489). The Lusignan kings used the castle mainly as a political prison. In particular, Peter I when reluctantly warned by his friend John Visconti of the queen's infidelity, repaid the favour by imprisoning and torturing him at Kyrenia, and later locking Visconti up at Buffavento to starve to death. By the 16th century, the castle was dismantled by the Venetians in an attempt to protect themselves, as their focus moved to the strongholds along the coast at Kyrenia and Famagusta.

From the seaward side, the castle is almost invisible, and the best long distance view is from the Nicosia side, where you can clearly see the remains of the castle bulging out from the top of the mountain. On the top level there are remains of a few buildings and a ruined chapel. However, the climb is worth it for the views alone, taking in Kyrenia, Famagusta, Nicosia and, on a good day, the Troodos Mountains.

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Kyrenia, Cyprus
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Details

Founded: 10th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Cyprus

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mohamed Sobhy (5 months ago)
Location is not real it's fake location
Lidor Bal Ash (2 years ago)
Comfortably organised stairs and trail up to the castle for some beautiful views!
Stuart Fathers (2 years ago)
Well worth the effort. Come from the road from the east, better condition and tremendous views. Leave via the west to complete the circuit. Yes it is a climb but, the end result in views and depiction of, basically a watch tower, is quite extraordinary
Elizabet Kapás (2 years ago)
Beautiful place from all the castles we visited on the on the Turkish side of Cyprus this one we liked the most. The longest climb from all but it worth’s every step.
Marian Cincar (2 years ago)
Nice place, but unfortunately fog weather complicated sight. Nice also for increasing condiction because more than 200 stairs up.
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