Saint Hilarion Castle

Kyrenia, Cyprus

The Saint Hilarion Castle is the best preserved ruin of the three former strongholds in the Kyrenia mountains, the others being Kantara and Buffavento. Saint Hilarion was originally a monastery, named after a monk who allegedly chose the site for his hermitage, with a monastery and a church built there in the 10th century. Starting in the 11th century, the Byzantines began fortification. Saint Hilarion formed the defense of the island with the castles of Buffavento and Kantara against Arab pirates raiding the coast. Some sections were further upgraded under the Lusignan rule, who may have used it as a summer residence. During the rule of Lusignans, the castle was the focus of a four-year struggle between Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II and Regent John d' Ibelin for control of Cyprus.

The castle has three divisions or wards. The lower and middle wards served economic purposes, while the upper ward housed the royal family. The lower ward had the stables and the living quarters for the men-at-arms. The Prince John tower sits on a cliff high above the lower castle. The church lies on the middle ward. The upper ward was reserved for the Royals and can be entered via a well-preserved archway. Farm buildings are located in the west close to the royal apartments. Along the western wall, there is a breathtaking view of the northern coast of Cyprus, overlooking the city of Girne, from the Queen's Window.

Much of the castle was dismantled by the Venetians in the 15th century to reduce the up-keeping cost of garrisons.

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Details

Founded: 10th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Cyprus

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tony Thomson (16 months ago)
Remarkable Castle build on the top of a hill, access through a military training ground so only open at fixed times. There is a lot to see & the views are amazing. Very worth a visit if your in the area.
Anders Holt Knudsen (16 months ago)
A magnificent masterpiece of early Knights Templar castles. It is very beautiful situated on top of the mountain with beautiful views over Kyrenia. It is possible to take your car up the mountain or climb it from the city. The hike can be recommended but it is tough and long. Admission is 7 lire or 5 for students as of 2019.
Julie R. (16 months ago)
Totally recommended. Cool views and cheap too. If you got the guts to go till the top you won't regret it.
Laura Valentina (2 years ago)
A castle ruin sightseeing attraction, very nice for a walk and have fresh air and view. Steps will be slippery after the rain. Go to the “peak” to see the soldier to get a photo on the highest point of the castle. Use comfortable shoes to enjoy the climb.
Linda Barwick (2 years ago)
Wow! Has to be seen to be believed! Breathtaking. It's a must for anyone staying in North Cyprus. Lots of steps! Be warned! Worth the effort though.
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