Château de Châteaugiron

Châteaugiron, France

Châteaugiron developed around its château from the 13th century onwards, becoming more prosperous towards the end of the Middle Ages as the canvas sail industry expanded. The town’s unique historic town centre is very well-preserved and features significant remains of the medieval fortress, renovated between 1450 and 1470 by Jean de Derval. Of the six original towers, four are still standing: the 38 metre high 13th-15th century keep, built independently of the château, the 14th-15th century clock tower, a belfry during the French Ancien Regime, and the 15th century watchtower and Cardinal’s tower, whose elevated patrol paths with machicolation projections has been preserved.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

www.brittanytourism.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Thierry Thomas (8 months ago)
Impeccable for a good walk around the castle in addition to the pond next to it ?
Lukas Henry (8 months ago)
Very beautiful and well maintained
Gregory Lemeunier (9 months ago)
Remarkable castle. A visit is essential.
Juliomagnus (10 months ago)
Pretty castle in the Marches de Bretagne located in the town center of Chateaugiron! Beautiful center with half-timbered houses and covered markets!
Romain Ghx (2 years ago)
Magnificent castle! An exemplary renovation
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