Château de Combourg

Combourg, France

The original castle on the site of current Château de Combourg was built around 1025 by Archbishop Guinguené, who gave it to his illegitimate brother Riwallon. Major alterations were made between the 15th and 19th centuries. The castle consists of four large, powerful buildings of dressed granite, with crenellations and machicolations, enclosing a rectangular courtyard. In each corner of this massive fortress is a round tower, also with crenellations and machicolations, with conical roofs. In 1761, the Chateaubriand family acquired the property and it was the childhood home of François-René de Chateaubriand (1768–1848).

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Address

D794 2-8, Combourg, France
See all sites in Combourg

Details

Founded: 1025
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

martin.d humpston (12 months ago)
Love the tour the down side we were handed a book which was 4 or 5 pages long to follow the tour while guide spoke in France didn't make since need to translate while going around.
Peter Chester (2 years ago)
Great park Interesting house. Good guide but only in French.
Grace Richards (2 years ago)
The grounds are lovely (we didn't get to explore much as it was raining) but I wouldn't recommend the tour unless a fluent French speaker! I thought we'd just be able to look around the Château by ourselves but you could only go in as part of the group which wasn't ideal!
Roger Scott (2 years ago)
An enjoyable afternoon but the castle can only be visited with a guide- and some are much better than others. Dont try and drag young children round the castle! Spacious gardens and Combourg is a very pleasant place to visit in any case!
Harvey Mains (2 years ago)
Grounds are beautiful. We were too late for a tour, so I just walked around and absorbed the wonderful ambience. The town is charming with a lake.
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