St. James' Church

Utrecht, Netherlands

The Jacobikerk is named after its patron saint St. James the Greater. The church is one of the medieval parish churches of Utrecht, along with the Buurkerk, the Nicolaïkerk and the Geertekerk. Today it is known as the starting place for Dutch pilgrims on their way to Santiago de Compostella along the Way of St. James.

The current gothic church dates from the end of the 13th century, but was expanded in the 14th and 15th centuries. In 1576-1577 a cannon was installed in the church tower, aimed at Vredenburg (castle) where the Spanish soldiers there were under siege by the Utrecht schutters. Around 1580 the church endured the protestant reformation and in 1586 it was formally handed over to the protestants, who whitewashed the wall decorations and removed the altarpieces. The tower bell was made by S. Butendiic in 1479.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robin Croft (17 months ago)
Church interior now used for concerts and other events. Open most days.
Oren Malkin (2 years ago)
Recommend
Naga kumar (2 years ago)
Great church!
Tatiana anaitat (2 years ago)
It is nice but nothing amazing
Wander Lust (3 years ago)
As much as I like the calming influence of the church, this review is actually for the flowermarket on saturday. During summer a large part of the square is scattered with people selling flowers and little trees, in autumn/winter a core group of flowersellers are positioned against the church. The ones from a stall of brightly coloured girls and some guys (priced €12,50) stay fresh for long but some other stalls have a nice batch too...Depends on the variety, day, time you visit. At the end of the day they will have a slight discount.
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