Batenburg Castle Ruins

Batenburg, Netherlands

Batenburg Castle construction was probably started around the year 1300. The castle was rebuilt in 1600 on the foundations of an earlier structure; The present castle was destroyed by fire in 1795 and is now preserved as ruins: the ring wall with towers, the remains of three extended round towers with a basement underneath and the remains of the gatehouse. These are flanked by semicircular towers, all built with limestone brick.

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Details

Founded: c. 1300
Category: Ruins in Netherlands

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Castle Biker (19 months ago)
imposante ruïne. Wat moet dat vroeger een groot kasteel zijn geweest. Ligt midden in het kleine dorpje Batenburg. Ook als de poort gesloten is, kun je er toch mooi omheen wandelen.
Craig Van Batenburg (2 years ago)
As you can see my ancestors helped make the castle about 800 years ago. History can ground you as you get connected to this world. An enchated place.
Joshua Naarden (2 years ago)
Wow so special
Arjan van de Rest (3 years ago)
Very rich history
Anne Marie Kuijpers-Jagtman (3 years ago)
Castle ruine in the old village of Batenburg. Interesting to make a short walk in this sleeping village.
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