The origins of Hernen lie to the west of the present castle, next to the river Elst. That is where the first motte castle of Hernen was sited, and remained in use until the 12th/13th century. This was possibly also the fortress of the Lords of Hernen, who first appear in the records in 1247. The lord received income through taxes and special privileges, such as the milling rights. This income enabled him to extend his castle, which in turn increased his status.

Around that time, Hernen was partly in Cleves and partly in Gelderland. In the 14th century, work started on the construction of the present castle, which was sited on the Gelderland part. Later, everything came again under one estate. The east wing and the monumental entry gate date from 1555. A special feature is the covered patrol path - quite rare in the Netherlands.

The castle never suffered war damage or natural disasters. In the last century, the lord of the castle hardly ever lived there, leaving the administration to a steward. There was no urge to embellish the castle according to the latest fashion in architecture, and consequently the castle was able to keep its austere, medieval character.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nancy Underwood (13 months ago)
Didn't go inside, but the castle was nice to see and walk around.
Nancy Underwood (13 months ago)
Didn't go inside, but the castle was nice to see and walk around.
Bob Oorsprong (13 months ago)
A very very cool castle/museum, they have little carry lanterns wich you take around. When you hold it in front of little plates on the wall, it starts giving you information about what is in that room and what they did with expanding back in the time. It's the only castle that hasn't been renovated over te years. Only expanded in the time being. They also had a very cool room with lights and a voice over telling you and showing you on a scale model what happend to the castle. Really great for kids but also cool for just people who like to see castles
Bob Oorsprong (13 months ago)
A very very cool castle/museum, they have little carry lanterns wich you take around. When you hold it in front of little plates on the wall, it starts giving you information about what is in that room and what they did with expanding back in the time. It's the only castle that hasn't been renovated over te years. Only expanded in the time being. They also had a very cool room with lights and a voice over telling you and showing you on a scale model what happend to the castle. Really great for kids but also cool for just people who like to see castles
Frank Wils (2 years ago)
Wonderful medieval castle. One of the few castles in Holland that haven't been renewed or changed since the medieval times. Maybe the outside isn't as attractive as a castle which makes it quite unknown. Also the only castle in Holland with covered closed walks. Purposely almost unfurnished except for the few exhibition rooms. Nice area around to walk. Check out the children activities if you have kids!
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