Onze Lieve Vrouwetoren

Amersfoort, Netherlands

The Onze-Lieve-Vrouwetoren ('The Tower of Our Lady') is a Late Gothic church tower which is 98.33 metres tall and reaches high above the inner city. It's one of the most eye-catching monuments in town and the third highest church tower in the Netherlands. The church that belonged to the tower was destroyed by a gunpowder explosion in the 18th century.

The first chapel on site was constructed on this site in the 14th century. In the 15th century the chapel was replaced by new church with three aisles. When the tower was built is not exactly known. Construction started around 1444 and was finished around 1470. The official documents of the construction were destroyed by the Protestants in 1579 during the reformation and the ensuing iconoclasm. The church and tower were taken over by the Protestants and no longer belonged to the Catholics.

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Details

Founded: 1444
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Natalia Li (17 months ago)
Impressi e tower with a pretty houses nearby which added up to a great walk. Currently closed but worth a visit when it reopens. It chimed every few minutes when we were there, that was also pleasant
Max (2 years ago)
The tour guide was nice
Tim Rottier (2 years ago)
Really nice church
John Kariuki (2 years ago)
The tour guide was really nice. The 1 hour at 12:30 is well timed so that by the time you get to the top, you hear the 1PM bells and another one at 1:15PM to start taking the stairs down. I don't speak Dutch (yet) so I did understand most of the tour guide's words but it's still an amazing experience.
Magdalena Ćwioro (2 years ago)
Nice viewpoint
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