Hackfort Manor was originally a keep that was expanded into a castle in the 13th century. It was destroyed by Spanish troops in 1586 and rebuilt in 1600. It is one of the best preserved fortified stately homes in the province of Gelderland.

The most famous descendant of the Van Hackfort line was Berent (1475-1557). In 1502, he entered the service of the Duke of Guelders and even became commander and deputy to the duke. He also held various posts in the duchy; everything from sheriff to steward. At the time, the Duke of Guelders was at war with the Spanish Habsburg ruler and Holy Roman Emperor, Charles V, in an attempt to protect his duchy from the Habsburgs. When the Duchy of Guelders finally lost its independence in 1543, Berent was among those who signed the treaty. Berent lived to the age of 80 and his tomb can still be seen in the church in Vorden.

In 1585, Spanish troops conquered the city of Zutphen and the region turned into a battleground. It was plundered and burned by friend and foe alike and during a failed attempt by the Maurice of Nassau’s Dutch States Army to win back Zutphen, Hackfort Castle was destroyed by the Spaniards. It wasn’t until 1591 that Prince Maurice managed to reclaim Zutphen so that the region could slowly start to recover.

In 1788, Hackfort Castle underwent substantial renovations. The old gate house and outbuildings were demolished and the canals were filled in. The castle was transformed into an 18th-century manor house. Today, only the two towers serve as reminders of the former castle. In 1981, Hackfort Manor passed to The Netherlands Natural Heritage Society (Natuurmonumenten) and the house, coach house and watermill have since been restored and opened to the public. Hackfort Manor’s lovely estate is open to the public as well and the natural heritage society is currently working hard to restore the gardens to their original condition.

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Founded: 1600
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Netherlands

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User Reviews

Barry Ten Thy (2 years ago)
Vroeger werd in de kasteeltuin groente, fruit en bloemen voor eigen gebruik geteeld. Oude tijden herleven. Als u nu een gerecht bestelt wordt de groente zo door de kok uit de tuin geoogst en bereid. In het voormalig koetshuis van het kasteel is een brasserie gevestigd, een fantastisch adres voor een heerlijke lunch, diner of borrel. Lokale producten. Koken met verse producten uit eigen moestuin. Voor de lekkere gerechten’ is het even wachten,maar dan heb je ook wat. goede smaakcombinaties. heerlijke wijnen. gastvrij vriendelijke bediening.
Ilse Grande (3 years ago)
Je kan hier heerlijk wandelen en zelfgemaakte Jam en honing kopen.
Han Groot (3 years ago)
Heel mooi, een wandeling over het Hackfort maken, de watermolen bekijken en even uitrusten op het terras
Caroline Kamphuis (3 years ago)
Mooi om kleinere wandeling te maken, voor grotere loop je al snel evenwijdig aan straten, waardoor het verkeer duidelijk hoorbaar is. Prachtig om te zien hoe een houtkustenaar deze dassen uit boomstammen maakte. Één was er af de andere al een heel eind op weg. Super mooi!
Jorrit Willems (3 years ago)
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