Groeningemuseum

Bruges, Belgium

The Groeningemuseum is built on the site of the medieval Eekhout Abbey. It houses a comprehensive survey of six centuries of Flemish and Belgian painting, from Jan van Eyck to Marcel Broodthaers. The museum's many highlights include its collection of 'Flemish Primitive' art, works by a wide range of Renaissance and Baroque masters, as well as a selection of paintings from the 18th and 19th century neo-classical and realist periods, milestones of Belgian symbolism and modernism, masterpieces of Flemish expressionism and many items from the city's collection of post-war modern art.

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Address

Groeninge 15, Bruges, Belgium
See all sites in Bruges

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Category: Museums in Belgium

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bill Edwards (11 months ago)
All on one level so accessible for wheelchairs. Compact so can be done in a couple of hours. A good spread from medieval to modern. Great to see Hieronymus Bosch's work in the flesh.
Alejandro Garcia Lemos (11 months ago)
This a great size and temático museum. Mostly focus on Flemish primitive and Jan Van Dick. There are some painting that will leave you speechless. Only recomendad for those who enjoy attention to the detail to the level of obsession. It’s also a great building! Enjoy it!
Fabio Diglio (11 months ago)
During Bruges’ Golden Age, the 15th century, the fine arts prevailed and the great Flemish Primitives made a name for themselves. The world-renowned works of Jan Van Eyck and other prominent Flemish Masters can be admired at the Groeningemuseum, the main museum in Bruges. For art lovers.
Paul Beckman (2 years ago)
This is a small, extremely manageable, well-though-out museum with some great works by Flemish masters from early through modern periods. Reasonably priced entry. Maybe a bit too small and missing some of the highlights that you might expect from the public description, but absolutely worth a visit.
Melchior Spruit (2 years ago)
Totally loved the great art that goes back many ages. Especially touching is the spiritualism gallery. The paintings are diverse and never boring. Go discover this wonderful museum, because this is slow food for the soul.
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