Wageningen Castle Ruins

Wageningen, Netherlands

Because of its strategic location Wageningen was granted city rights as early as the 13th century. To strengthen the city Duke Charles of Guelders built a castle shortly after 1500. An imposing 17th-century model of the fortified town with its moat, walls, towers and castle makes up the centerpiece of the history room of the museum. After the destruction of the castle by French troops in 1672 the then lord of the castle, Baron Adolph Lubbert Torck, built a new castle on the foundations of the old one. In the basement of the museum can be seen the remains of the gatehouse of Torck’s castle.

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Founded: 1500-1526
Category: Ruins in Netherlands

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