Wageningen Castle Ruins

Wageningen, Netherlands

Because of its strategic location Wageningen was granted city rights as early as the 13th century. To strengthen the city Duke Charles of Guelders built a castle shortly after 1500. An imposing 17th-century model of the fortified town with its moat, walls, towers and castle makes up the centerpiece of the history room of the museum. After the destruction of the castle by French troops in 1672 the then lord of the castle, Baron Adolph Lubbert Torck, built a new castle on the foundations of the old one. In the basement of the museum can be seen the remains of the gatehouse of Torck’s castle.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1500-1526
Category: Ruins in Netherlands

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

rikvb01 (3 years ago)
Awesome university, beautiful campus.
Nathanna Mateus (3 years ago)
A incredible, multicultural University, excellence in research and education. I worked at Rikilt Institute, part of WUR and I miss the friendly atmosphere and many colleges. Some of them are my friends until now.
arun khanal (3 years ago)
Top most agriculture university in the world. Located in a peaceful environment. Every agriculturist have dream to study here.
Yatee (3 years ago)
I have been there for training, it was so nice. Very good campus
Agung Irawan (4 years ago)
This is a perfect university to study agriculture in wide term. Many institution in the world placed this university as best university in agricultural sciences in the world. A nice campus, healthy life, and comprehensive facilities will help student to improve their skills and networking. Wish someday come here again
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.