During the Middle Ages Cunerakerk was an important pilgrimage site. The church has stored the relics of the Saint Cunera since the 8th century. The first church on site was dedicated to Petrus (before 11th century). In the 11th century the church was dedicated to Saint Cunera. A legend tells about her stay at the court of king Radboud in Rhenen. The church was built and enlarged in the 15th century. The tower was built from 1492 until 1531 and its design is inspired by the Domtoren in Utrecht.

Since the Reformation in 1580 the Cunerachurch is in use by the Protestants. The relics of Cunera are spread since then.

The church has often been damaged. In 1897 the tower burned and a restoration was done with a different spire (designed by Pierre Cuypers). During the next restoration in 1934 the roof burned down and during restoration of the roof a section collapsed. In 1940 the tower and church were damaged by war, and in 1945 it was again heavily damaged by the war. The building material used for subsequent repairs was so bad that in 1968 restoration of the tower was necessary again.

The rood screen of the choir was built in 1550 in the Renaissance style. It is one of the few rood screens still existing in the Netherlands. It is decorated with allegoric images of the three theological virtues: faith, hope and love. Part of the sculpture is gone. The choir stalls were cut in 1570.

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Address

Markt 1, Rhenen, Netherlands
See all sites in Rhenen

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Arie Bravenboer (20 months ago)
Prachtig gerestaureerde kerk die je gezien moet hebben!!
Xander Wassenaar (21 months ago)
Schitterende kerk met hele mooie akoestiek
Remmo Tolsma (2 years ago)
Prachtige uitvoering van de Messiah van Händel.
Leon de Borst (2 years ago)
Monumentale en reusachtige kerk in Rhenen. Mooi gerestaureerd. In gebruik bij twee gemeenten, waarbij ik voor één ervan voorging in de kerkdienst. Avonddienst niet slecht bezocht. Warme kerk met goed geluid en mooi orgel. Fijne plek om God te zoeken en hopelijk ook te vinden.
Pieter van der Valk (3 years ago)
Beautiful located church worth visiting. You are welcomed by volunteers The history of st. Cunera is explained. The church and tower are open almost all days.
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