Stolzenfels Castle

Koblenz, Germany

Finished in 1259, Stolzenfels was used to protect the toll station at the Rhine, where the ships, back then were the main transport for goods, had to stop and pay toll. Over the years it was extended several times, occupied by French and Swedish troops in the Thirty Years' War and finally, in 1689, destroyed by the French during the Nine Years' War.

For 150 years the ruins decayed, until in 1815 they were given as a present to Frederick William IV of Prussia by the city of Koblenz. Following the romantic traditions, the prince started to completely rebuild the castle after 1826 as a summer residence. Supported by famous neoclassic architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel, the castle was completely remodeled in the then fashionable neo-Gothic style, aiming to create a romantic place representing the idea of medieval knighthood - the architects even created a tournament site.

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Address

Waldweg, Koblenz, Germany
See all sites in Koblenz

Details

Founded: 1259/1826
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Harry Watanabe (31 days ago)
The museum was really nice! So was the view.
Save my memory Photography (8 months ago)
Awesome scenery, great castle.
sasgreeneyes68 jansen (8 months ago)
Beautiful castle. Only thing is the walk up there, like 800 metres (plus back), quite straight up, plus the fact that inside the building you are NOT allowed to take pictures or videos. (I kind of ignored that, lol)
Sheldon Munns (10 months ago)
Beautiful Castle, the grounds were outstanding!
Philippe GUEGAN (10 months ago)
Garden is lovely. Superb roses and fountain. Inside is just ok.
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