Stolzenfels Castle

Koblenz, Germany

Finished in 1259, Stolzenfels was used to protect the toll station at the Rhine, where the ships, back then were the main transport for goods, had to stop and pay toll. Over the years it was extended several times, occupied by French and Swedish troops in the Thirty Years' War and finally, in 1689, destroyed by the French during the Nine Years' War.

For 150 years the ruins decayed, until in 1815 they were given as a present to Frederick William IV of Prussia by the city of Koblenz. Following the romantic traditions, the prince started to completely rebuild the castle after 1826 as a summer residence. Supported by famous neoclassic architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel, the castle was completely remodeled in the then fashionable neo-Gothic style, aiming to create a romantic place representing the idea of medieval knighthood - the architects even created a tournament site.

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Address

Waldweg, Koblenz, Germany
See all sites in Koblenz

Details

Founded: 1259/1826
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Liam T (4 months ago)
Great views, but you can't just go into the castle.
T As (4 months ago)
Beautiful castle with garden in the courtyard. All looked well maintained. Only downside was the tour guide only spoke German.
Steve Fisher (5 months ago)
This is a fantastic site to visit, guided tours are by extremely knowledgable guides. There is a lot here to see and it’s all original period. Would recommend visiting to anyone visiting the area.
Claudio Cafarelli (6 months ago)
Looks very nice from outside, but it is closed until april. There is anyway a nice park where walking, with a nice view over the river. The castle is on top of a hill, so it takes a 10 min walk to reach the top, but the path is smooth. Nice for the babies who can run free. There is a parking at the bottom, but not that big.
Pyaree Mohan Dash (7 months ago)
3 star for castle, 5 for the hill! It begins with creepy walls (like old movie) and then when you go up... it's kinda romantic...
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