Lahneck Castle was built in 1226 by the Archbishop of Mainz Siegfried III of Eppstein to protect his territory at the mouth of the Lahn, where the town of Oberlahnstein and a silver mine had come into the possession of the Archbishopric in 1220. The castle chapel, dedicated to Saint Ulrich of Augsburg, was built in 1245, in the same year the first Burggraf took up residence in the castle.

In 1298, King Adolf of Nassau was a guest at the castle, shortly before his death in the Battle of Göllheim against King Albert I of Habsburg. In order to avenge him, the Burggraf of Lahneck, Friedrich Schilling of Lahnstein, participated in a conspiracy against Albert. The castle was stormed in 1309 and Friedrich Schilling was executed.

According to legend, when the Knights Templar were ordered by Pope Clement V to disband in 1312, the last 12 Templars took refuge in the castle, where they perished in a heroic fight to the death with forces of Mainz Archbishop Peter of Aspelt. In 1332, Pope John XXII granted a 40-day indulgence to those attending services in the castle chapel.

In 1475, Mainz Archbishop Theodoric of Isenburg-Büdingen had the castle strengthened with two outer walls following the Mainz Bishops Feud with his rival archbishop, Adolph II of Nassau. In 1633, during the Thirty Years War, the castle was heavily damaged by Swedish and Imperial troops.

On July 18, 1774, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe wrote the poem Geistesgruß. It was inspired by the sight of Lahneck Castle during his travels along the Lahn River.

In the German Mediatisation of 1803, in which the Archbishopric of Mainz lost its secular territories, Lahneck Castle was granted to the Duchy of Nassau. In 1850 it was sold and has remained in private ownership since. Edward Moriarty, a Director of the Rhenish Railway Company, became one of its first owners. During the ownership of Earl Kleist-Tychow a more than life-sized portrait of Queen Victoria was presented which can still be seen at the castle. Imperial Admiral Robert Mischke, later commander of armoured cruiser 'von der Tann', purchased the castle in 1909 and it has been owned by his family ever since.

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Details

Founded: 1226
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anthony Eziuka (11 months ago)
Very good
Monica S (11 months ago)
I loved the tour of the castle.
Gints Kļaviņš (12 months ago)
Beautiful view of Rhine and Lahn. Lowely Restaurant. Will come back to see the castle inside
Ilse van den Berg (15 months ago)
Nice castle
Dmytro Prokopchuk (2 years ago)
Very authentic place, incredibly beautiful exterior. Great guide! Unlike in many places, here you can touch furniture inside the castle.
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