Lahneck Castle

Lahnstein, Germany

Lahneck Castle was built in 1226 by the Archbishop of Mainz Siegfried III of Eppstein to protect his territory at the mouth of the Lahn, where the town of Oberlahnstein and a silver mine had come into the possession of the Archbishopric in 1220. The castle chapel, dedicated to Saint Ulrich of Augsburg, was built in 1245, in the same year the first Burggraf took up residence in the castle.

In 1298, King Adolf of Nassau was a guest at the castle, shortly before his death in the Battle of Göllheim against King Albert I of Habsburg. In order to avenge him, the Burggraf of Lahneck, Friedrich Schilling of Lahnstein, participated in a conspiracy against Albert. The castle was stormed in 1309 and Friedrich Schilling was executed.

According to legend, when the Knights Templar were ordered by Pope Clement V to disband in 1312, the last 12 Templars took refuge in the castle, where they perished in a heroic fight to the death with forces of Mainz Archbishop Peter of Aspelt. In 1332, Pope John XXII granted a 40-day indulgence to those attending services in the castle chapel.

In 1475, Mainz Archbishop Theodoric of Isenburg-Büdingen had the castle strengthened with two outer walls following the Mainz Bishops Feud with his rival archbishop, Adolph II of Nassau. In 1633, during the Thirty Years War, the castle was heavily damaged by Swedish and Imperial troops.

On July 18, 1774, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe wrote the poem Geistesgruß. It was inspired by the sight of Lahneck Castle during his travels along the Lahn River.

In the German Mediatisation of 1803, in which the Archbishopric of Mainz lost its secular territories, Lahneck Castle was granted to the Duchy of Nassau. In 1850 it was sold and has remained in private ownership since. Edward Moriarty, a Director of the Rhenish Railway Company, became one of its first owners. During the ownership of Earl Kleist-Tychow a more than life-sized portrait of Queen Victoria was presented which can still be seen at the castle. Imperial Admiral Robert Mischke, later commander of armoured cruiser 'von der Tann', purchased the castle in 1909 and it has been owned by his family ever since.

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Details

Founded: 1226
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Shannon Ryan (3 months ago)
Rare treat to visit at night. Some very interesting history. Part of the castle is still occupied as a residence. It is worth a visit.
Crash Override (6 months ago)
PRO: Easy access to castle. Parking alot. Short period of tours (between 11 and 14h) Beautyfull castle with authentic furniture and requisites. Friendly guide who will answer some questions in english. CON: 11euro for german tour only but there is paper version available in many languages. Short tour in NOT ALL places. Some interieurs are out of date and do mismatch the period of the castle.
France Arante (2 years ago)
Nice overlooking place from the restaurant of Burg Lahneck..the castle itself is quiet small to explore but the view was very amzing.they have also restuarant but kind of pricey.the tour is until 2:30 or 2pm you need to visit earlier to avail the tour inside the castle.
Gen Bowerbank (2 years ago)
Our tour guide was fabulous, our tour was only thirty minutes, but we saw quite a bit in that short time. There is a small coffee shop just outside, and a few trails you can explore.
Angie Brandt (3 years ago)
We were treated to a night tour courtesy of Ama Waterways and it was a really neat experience. Short tour but worth the trip indeed.
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