Schönburg Castle

Oberwesel, Germany

Schönburg Castle was first mentioned in history between the years 911 and 1166. From the 12th century, the Dukes of Schönburg ruled over the town of Oberwesel and had also the right to levy customs on the Rhine river. The most famous was Friedrich von Schönburg - a much-feared man known as “Marshall Schomberg” - who in the 17th century served as a colonel and as a general under the King of France in France and Portugal and later also for the Prussians and for William Prince of Orange in England.

The Schönburg line died out with the last heir, the son of Friedrich of Schönburg. The castle was burned down in 1689 by French soldiers during the Palatinate wars. It remained in ruins for 200 years until it was acquired by the German-American Rhinelander family who bought the castle from the town of Oberwesel in the late 19th century, and restored it.

The town council of Oberwesel acquired the castle back from the Rhinelander family in 1950. Since 1957 the Hüttl family have been living at the castle on a long-term lease; they operate a hotel and restaurant there.

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Address

K90, Oberwesel, Germany
See all sites in Oberwesel

Details

Founded: 1100-1149
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tyler (18 months ago)
Wow! From the time we arrived to the time we left, we felt like Royals staying here! The castle is absolutely beautiful, our room was amazing, the view was fantastic
Michael Burgardt (18 months ago)
Haven't really been inside, but it has great aesthetics, very friendly and helpful staff and an incredible view.
jonathan messing (2 years ago)
Phenomenal views, restaurant offered a 4 course meal with our stay, the food was brilliant. We brought our baby and they gave us a packnplay. The rooms were neat and the small details were appreciated .
John Graf (2 years ago)
What can we say. Just an awesome castle to stay, awesome service and 4 course meal served to fit a king and queen honorably. Great originally castle grounds and places to explore. Interesting museum and castle tower to explore. Great gardens to explore and enjoy the peace of the surrounds. ..
BECKY TAYLOR (2 years ago)
Amazing castle with so much to explore. 5 star service from all the staff. Restaurant has delicious and interesting dishes, and you can eat while enjoying the views. Rooms are comfortable with lots of extras. Be sure to spend time exploring the gardens. Definitely recommend
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