Gutenfels Castle

Kaub, Germany

Gutenfels Castle was built in 1220. It was used with Pfalzgrafenstein Castle in the middle of the Rhein and the fortified town of Kaub on the far side to provide an impenetrable toll zone for the Holy Roman Emperor until Prussia purchased the area (1866) and ended this toll in 1867.

This castle, primarily owned (since 1257) by the Falkenstein family, is one of the most important examples of the Hohenstaufen military and house construction style at the Rhine. Since 1277 it has been a castle of the Electorate of Palatinate. After an unsuccessful siege in 1504 by landgrave Wilhelm from Hessen, the castle was renamed Gutenfels (solid rock). Rebuilt between 1889 and 1892 it is now used as a hotel.

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Address

Schlossweg 16, Kaub, Germany
See all sites in Kaub

Details

Founded: 1220
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Julian Steiner (8 months ago)
Mega schöne Burg. Leider in Privatbesitz also nicht leicht zu besichtigen. Aber sieht mega aus bin selbst schon hochgewandert.
Chip Elliott (9 months ago)
Actually spent the night here in April 1997. Beautiful views ... my daughters loved it.
Frank Engel (10 months ago)
Gutenfels Castle (en alemán : Burg Gutenfels ), también conocido como Caub Castle , es un castillo situado a 110 m sobre la ciudad de Kaub en Renania-Palatinado , Alemania . El castillo de Gutenfels fue construido en 1220. Se usó con el castillo de peaje , el castillo de Pfalzgrafenstein en el centro del Rhein y la ciudad fortificada de Kaub en el lado más alejado para proporcionar una zona impenetrable contra el peaje para el emperador del Sacro Imperio Romano hasta que Prusia compró el Área (1866) y terminó este peaje en 1867.El castillo es parte de la Garganta del Rin , un sitio del Patrimonio Mundial de la UNESCO en 2002. El castillo pasó de ser un hotel a propiedad privada en 2006.Lo he visto por fuerra como esta ya propiedad privada . Le he dado una vuelta y he visto algo más de historia .
Frank Sauerborn (10 months ago)
In der Sonne leuchtend viel Sie mir vom Schiff aus ins Auge. Sehr schöne Burg die leider in Privatbesitz ist und somit nicht so einfach besichtigt werden kann.
Martin Hankel (2 years ago)
Top !!! :-)
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