The exact building year of Stahleck castle is not known, but it has been proved that the castle was already occupied since the year 1095. It's first mentioned in documents in the year 1135 under Goswin von Hochstadt. Until 1148 almost 10 years of fight followed for the rights of the Stahleck.

In the year 1156, after the death of Hermann of Stahleck, his stepbrother Konrad von Hohenstaufen became count palatine of Bacharach on the Rhine river. The town of Bacharach, which is situated on the castle mountain, became center and residence of the originating palatine territory on the Rhine river. Castle Stahleck, which was originally the most farthest southern situated property of the Cologne bishops, was assigned from the emporer Barbarossa to his brother Konrad in the year 1190.

In the Thirty Years' War, in year 1644, as the Catholic party banished the French out of the town with 250 cavalries and 450 Cologne foot soldiers, these fled into the castle Stahleck. Colonel of Nievernheimb, commander on the fortress Ehrenbreitstein, let the castle Stahleck near Bacharach at the Rhine river thereupon be fired at without occupying it. Th restoration was made in 1666 by the elector count palatine Carl Ludwig.

Between January and May 1689 the Stahleck castle was exploded by the french troops from Ludwig XIV. 237 years it was in a ruins, until the crown prince of Preußen bought the area in 1828. Rhine river society accomplished restoration work in 1909 and 1910.

Starting at the end of 1965 until May 20, 1967, the youth hostel was further constructed on the castle Stahleck. Thereby the in the substructure still original roman Bergfried of the castle Stahleck with abated wall strength was newly roofed and furnished with new walls. Today it expresses the picture of a medieval castle with different construction phases and is one of the most well-known youth hostels.

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Address

K24, Bacharach, Germany
See all sites in Bacharach

Details

Founded: c. 1135
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Scott G (3 months ago)
Stayed here 20 years ago. The hike to the top was brutal with full backpacks but staff was great as was the view. Typical hostel setting with small rooms and bunk beds. Food was good. I don't understand the complaints about small rooms and two bathrooms/showers. It's a hostel. That's what you get. Good grief. If you want a bed and private bath then get a hotel or B&B. Took a great cruise down the Rhine in town, too.
André Nickel (4 months ago)
I was here to visit and to have some drinks. Nice staff and the visitation was ok, no tours available. I would like to stay here overnight.
Sebastiaan Knetsch (5 months ago)
Ever wanted to sleep in a castle? Well this is the most affordable way of doing it, it's a hostel in a Castle. The rooms are ok (smaller ones are nice) and the bar/food is decent (not great). The surrounding area is really really really beautiful....
Стела Краева (6 months ago)
First time to be accommodated in a real castle. Great place for an event or weekend get away. Very high value for your money. Food is amazing and has a relatively high variaty. For people with special diet recommend to request special food in advance. Very close to the city centre and also on main trails for hiking and biking.
Jesper Holm (9 months ago)
Fantastic location! Helpful and friendly staff. Clean rooms. Good breakfast. Excellent value for money. Highly recommended!
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