Martberg Archaeological Park

Pommern, Germany

Nearly 200 m above the Mosel river next to Pommern and Karden lays the high plateau of the Martberg. Its name still reminds you of the celtic-roman god Lenus-Mars who has been worshipped here in ancient times.

In the celtic period, around 100 BC, the Martberg was a central town an oppidum of the local celtic tribe called Treveri. According to current research the plateau of 45 ha was densly settled with small houses made of wood and clay. The settlement was surrounded by a wall constructed out of timber and stones. The evidence of coinage, handicraft and many imported goods emphasize the importance of the settlement in these times.

In the central area of the mountain archaeologists found a sanctuary of several celtic-roman temples which date from the 1st century BC to the 4th century AD. The sanctuary was surrounded by a large rectangular collonade which has been 60 to 70 m. In the center stood the main temple built in the typical celtic-roman style. It had a central square building called cella and a surrounding roofed verandah with stone pillars. The cella was the most important part of the temple because there was the god’s statue placed. Next to the central temple four smaller temples were discovered built in the same way as the main temple. In the sanctuary archaeologists found large quantities of offerings. The believers offered more than 10.000 coins, hundreds of fibulas, weapons as well as thousands of miniature ceramic vessels to their gods. In the course of the christianisation the sanctuary was abandoned after 400 AD. The religious center moved from the Martberg to Karden where an early christian community was established.

Since the year of 2006 AD it is possible to visit the celtic-roman sanctuary again. The major temple with its impressive wall paintings and one minor temple are reconstructed completely. Two other temples and the surrounding wall are rebuilt partly. Furthermore you can see some houses built in the way of the celtic period. Many of the objects from the Martberg and 2000 years of the history of Karden can be seen in the Stiftsmuseum of Treis-Karden. The museum is located next to the church of Karden.

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Category: Museums in Germany

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www.martberg-pommern.de

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Uwe Thiemann (3 years ago)
Ein römischer Tempel , anschaulich restauriert und gut erklärt . Öffnungszeiten beachten !
Florian Boos (3 years ago)
Leider geschlossen, aber schöner Ausflug.
Bjoern Sip (3 years ago)
Leider zu spät angekommen. Es war schön zu.
B. Sch. (3 years ago)
Das Alte Rom - ganz in unsrer Nähe. Tolle Location mit besonderer Stimmung bei Sonnenuntergang, toller Wanderweg dorthin.
Michael Schneider (4 years ago)
Einzigartiger Ort dieser Art an der gesamten Mosel. Nicht nur ein einzelner Tempel sondern ganze Teile der Tempelanlage sowie Keltische Wohnhäuser wiedererrichtet.
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