Grevenburg Castle Ruins

Traben-Trarbach, Germany

Grevenburg castle was built in 1350 by Count Johann III of Sponheim-Starkenburg and replaced Castle Starkenburg as the residence of the Rear County of Sponheim. With the extinction of the ruling male line of the Rhenish branch of the House of Sponheim in 1437 the castle became seat of the bailiff of the new Counts to Sponheim.

In 1680 it was conquered by Louis XIV of France and was extended, together with the fort of Mont Royal in the horshoe bend of the Mosel north of the town of Traben-Trarbach as a part of the fortifications. During the War of the Spanish Succession (1701–1714), in 1702 it was taken by the French under Taillardin and in 1704 on the express orders of the commanding officer John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough it was overpowered by Friedrich das Wehrschloss. The badly damaged castle was then occupied by the Dutch. In 1730 it was repaired by the Electorate of Trier for the defence of Koblenz and the Rhine river. In the War of the Polish Succession it was taken after three weeks' siege for the fourth and last time by the French who destroyed it in July 1734. The castle was blown up, huge chunks of it have plunged into the valley beneath.

Of the castle, although only the western wall of the former keep remains, the foundations are largely intact.

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Details

Founded: 1350
Category: Ruins in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

buz burrows (21 months ago)
Not much there but the view of the valley is amazing
Hans MacLambrechts (2 years ago)
Very nice stopover location with great views over the Moselle and to the nice village Traben-Trarbach.
Jessica Eekels (2 years ago)
Its ok but I have seen better places. I walked to the top which was really high. It felt like the stairs never ended and i had to stop several times because i was out of breath. I dont recommend it for people who are having health problems. Then when you get up the ruine was behind fences and the best view was having a terrace where people had diner so i couldnt enjoy it that much. Behind the restaurant you could enjoy a bit of the view to the east. Really a pity why the restaurant is right on the place you should suppose to enjoy a view :(
Łukasz Koniecki (2 years ago)
Nothing special to see. There is a beautiful view on the Traben-Trarbah an the Mozel though.
ABRAHAM BECKERS (2 years ago)
A landmark at the river Mosel left by the French in the 17th century. Nice restaurant. What a panirama!
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