The Nieuwe Kerk was built in 1649 after the Great Church had become too small. Construction was completed in 1656. The church was designed by the architect Peter Noorwits, who was assisted by the painter and architect Bartholomeus van Bassen. The church is considered a highlight of the early Protestant church architecture in the Netherlands. Like many churches of that time was the New Church, a central building. Unlike other central building, the church is no simple circular or multifaceted plan but there is a space of two octagonal sections which are connected by a slightly smaller proportion in which the pulpit was prepared. The architecture of the church shows elements of both Renaissance and Classicism. Two church bells by Coenraat Wegewaert in 1656 hang in their original bell-chairs.

The church has an organ built by the Dutch organ builder Johannes Duyschot (1645-1725) in 1702. The construction has left most of the pipework and the cupboard. The organ was rebuilt in 1867 by one of the best organ builders of that time, the business of Christian Gottlieb Friedrich Witte. They adjusted the design of the organ to make it suitable for modern Romantic music.

The Nieuwe Kerk contains the tombs of the brothers De Witt and of the philosopher Spinoza. Spinoza's tomb is in the churchyard.

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Address

Oude Kerk, Hague, Netherlands
See all sites in Hague

Details

Founded: 1649-1656
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ebrahim Shahraeeni (8 months ago)
Was there for Spinoza's tombstone!
Javier Lizarzaburu (2 years ago)
A bit odd. Not terribly welcome atmos but keeps an active cultural agenda
Paul De Klerk (3 years ago)
Beautiful inside. We watched the Ako play there.
Ricardo Munsel (3 years ago)
I've visited the church during a conference for work and the other time when it was used as a concert hall. Small but nice.
Casey Yardley (3 years ago)
Very cool building. Easy to walk to from train station and nice details on the building. It was locked but just seeing the building is cool!
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