The Nieuwe Kerk was built in 1649 after the Great Church had become too small. Construction was completed in 1656. The church was designed by the architect Peter Noorwits, who was assisted by the painter and architect Bartholomeus van Bassen. The church is considered a highlight of the early Protestant church architecture in the Netherlands. Like many churches of that time was the New Church, a central building. Unlike other central building, the church is no simple circular or multifaceted plan but there is a space of two octagonal sections which are connected by a slightly smaller proportion in which the pulpit was prepared. The architecture of the church shows elements of both Renaissance and Classicism. Two church bells by Coenraat Wegewaert in 1656 hang in their original bell-chairs.

The church has an organ built by the Dutch organ builder Johannes Duyschot (1645-1725) in 1702. The construction has left most of the pipework and the cupboard. The organ was rebuilt in 1867 by one of the best organ builders of that time, the business of Christian Gottlieb Friedrich Witte. They adjusted the design of the organ to make it suitable for modern Romantic music.

The Nieuwe Kerk contains the tombs of the brothers De Witt and of the philosopher Spinoza. Spinoza's tomb is in the churchyard.

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Oude Kerk, Hague, Netherlands
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Details

Founded: 1649-1656
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

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en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lex L (2 years ago)
Apart from the wonderful architecture, there exists here, in the heart of the Hague, a warm, welcoming community called Redeemer International Church. This represents centuries of worship and faith-filled prayer.
txllxt TxllxT (3 years ago)
The Nieuwe Kerk / New Church is a masterpiece of Dutch Classicism that was finished in 1656. In 1672 Johan and Cornelis de Witt (Republican and Remonstrant / non-Calvinist) got lynched by a Calvinist crowd. Both brothers were buried inside the New Church. The philosopher Baruch de Spinoza was a lifelong supporter of de Witt. He died in 1677. The Burial Monument mentions the fact that his bones are to be found in the Church yard. It is the only grave left. Baruch de Spinoza's legacy is connected with idealism, rationalism and atheism. Arguably he is the most important thinker of the seventeenth century.
Catalin Marcu (3 years ago)
Lovely architecture, very close to the city center.
tamilew329 (3 years ago)
The Zuiderstrand Theatre events are often held in this church. The interior has both modern and classic aspects. On Open Days (Monumenten Dag) you can get a tour of the grounds and also learn about the historic organ. Christmas Day, an afternoon concert is held. It is a nice way to celebrate the holidays. There is currently an English speaking group using the space on Sunday mornings for its worship service. Spinoza’s grave site is on the church grounds.
Jo Gar (3 years ago)
Lovely building conveniently located near public transport options.
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