Grote of Sint-Jacobskerk

Hague, Netherlands

The Groote Kerk of St. James (15th and 16th centuries) has a fine vaulted interior, and contains some old stained glass, a carved wooden pulpit (1550), a large organ and interesting sepulchral monuments, and some escutcheons of the knights of the Golden Fleece, placed here after the chapter of 1456.

It is remarkable for its fine tower and chime of bells, and contains the cenotaph monument of Jacob van Wassenaer Obdam, designed by Cornelis Moninckx and sculpted by Bartholomeus Eggers in 1667, and the renaissance tomb of Gerrit van Assendelft (1487 - 1558).

The church's six-sided tower is one of the tallest in the Netherlands. There are 34 panels with shields and names of knights of the golden fleece. The mechanical clock has 15 bells by M. de Haze in 1686, one by Jasper and Jan Moer from 1541, one from H. Van Trier from 1570, one by Coenraat Wegewaert from 1647, and one from C. Fremy from 1692 and 31 modern bells. In the church tower there is an automatic carillon by Libertus van den Burgh, from 1689.

The church endured a fire in 1539, and the stained glass windows were repaired by leading glass artists, including the brothers Dirk and Wouter Crabeth of Gouda. Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, who visited the church after the fire, sponsored two windows by the Crabeth's that due to their royal origin are the only two windows that have survived up to the present day. Under one of these windows lies a commemorative stone from 1857 for Constantijn and Christiaan Huygens, who were buried in unmarked graves in the choir of the church.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Matt Clarke (2 years ago)
Lovely church in The Hague centre
music user (2 years ago)
Not a church not open to the public don't waste your time as a tourist trying to get in. They won't even hang a sign to inform you NOT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC -- even though the restaurant next door has asked them over and over. But there was nice carillon music on this Monday as I passed by.
erling saez (3 years ago)
Nice outside.empty inside. Like the country.
Pieter van der Valk (3 years ago)
Impressive spacious building. Escape from the busy crowded streets of The Hague. Entrance is 2€ and the volenteers are very happy to explain interesting details of the church. For me the spaciousness is the most remarkable impression. Don't miss this one.
Josip Podobnik (3 years ago)
Beauty outside, but inside empty, void, vacant.
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