Grote of Sint-Jacobskerk

Hague, Netherlands

The Groote Kerk of St. James (15th and 16th centuries) has a fine vaulted interior, and contains some old stained glass, a carved wooden pulpit (1550), a large organ and interesting sepulchral monuments, and some escutcheons of the knights of the Golden Fleece, placed here after the chapter of 1456.

It is remarkable for its fine tower and chime of bells, and contains the cenotaph monument of Jacob van Wassenaer Obdam, designed by Cornelis Moninckx and sculpted by Bartholomeus Eggers in 1667, and the renaissance tomb of Gerrit van Assendelft (1487 - 1558).

The church's six-sided tower is one of the tallest in the Netherlands. There are 34 panels with shields and names of knights of the golden fleece. The mechanical clock has 15 bells by M. de Haze in 1686, one by Jasper and Jan Moer from 1541, one from H. Van Trier from 1570, one by Coenraat Wegewaert from 1647, and one from C. Fremy from 1692 and 31 modern bells. In the church tower there is an automatic carillon by Libertus van den Burgh, from 1689.

The church endured a fire in 1539, and the stained glass windows were repaired by leading glass artists, including the brothers Dirk and Wouter Crabeth of Gouda. Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, who visited the church after the fire, sponsored two windows by the Crabeth's that due to their royal origin are the only two windows that have survived up to the present day. Under one of these windows lies a commemorative stone from 1857 for Constantijn and Christiaan Huygens, who were buried in unmarked graves in the choir of the church.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Funke Eric (6 months ago)
Take a look inside, step into history. Look at all the people buried here in this place of worship.
Andrew Williams (6 months ago)
Take a tour of the tower. Some very interesting information and great views of the city.
D L (12 months ago)
I did a guide tour for 7€ and it was definitely worth it. So much history, and such a great view. It was really interesting and not boring at all. Highly recommended when you are in The Hague!!! The tourguide was really nice and he did a great job!!
Jurgen van Wichen (12 months ago)
Lovely church with a great historic past which goes back to 1400. Tip: search for "Haagse Toren beklimmen" to visit the tower of the church. 288 steps on the chairs to go. Really cool
Magdalena Domagala (14 months ago)
Good underground parties literally underground.
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