Gerulata was a Roman military camp located near today's Rusovce, a borough of Bratislava. It was part of the Roman province Pannonia and built in the 2nd century as a part of the Limes Romanus system. It was abandoned in the 4th century, when Roman legions withdrew from Pannonia.

Today there is a museum, which is part of the Bratislava City Museum. The most preserved object is a quadrilateral building 30 metres long and 30 metres wide, with 2.4 metre thick walls.

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Founded: 100-200 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Slovakia

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marián Dubina (18 months ago)
Ľudia so záujmom o históriu, nachádzajúci sa v správnom čase a na správnom mieste (apríl až október, utorok až nedeľa, vstupy od 10:00 do 16:30 h.) sa v malom priestore múzea môžu na chvíľu dostať do atmosféry antickej minulosti. Koho zvyšky osídlenia zaujmú viac - výrazne väčšia expozícia zrekonštruovaného, starorímskeho tábora sa nachádza v cca 30 km vzdialenej rakúskej obci Petronell-Carnuntum.
Davor Andrasic (2 years ago)
The most unfriendly and unkind personel I've ever seen
Branislava Patakova (2 years ago)
I like this place. I went with my parents and we had a lovely one day-trip.
Janice Sadler (2 years ago)
A fantastic Roman site and museum to visit a short bus ride from Bratislava. The headstones from the Roman graves discovered in the village are exceptional.
Christopher McGrillen (2 years ago)
This place is interesting, but there's only a small area to explore. It's quite far away from the centre of Bratislava, so I'd only recommend going if you're already in the area, otherwise it's not really worth traveling to.
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